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Diversity examined in 18 British, Swedish, and German newsrooms

A new study in Journalism Practice by Julia Lück, Tanjev Schultz, Sabine Kieslich, of the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, and Felix Simon and Alexandra Borchardt of the University of Oxford, explores the issue of internal diversity in newsrooms as a reflection of the society. The authors conducted semi-standardized interviews of editors-in-chief and managing editors … Continued


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Financial journalism emphasizes the social position of the experts

Economic journalism relies on words indicating a respectable, networked social position when describing their expert sources, a new study finds. Catherine Walsh from Cardiff University offers new perspective and support on the previous findings that journalists are insufficiently critical of their expert sources. The reason might not be due to a failure to challenge technical … Continued


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ARTICLE: Exposure to falsehoods in news and attempts to verify, from publics’ point of view

Falsehoods circulating online, such as fake news websites, rumours spread on purpose and political deceit, cause considerable concern for contemporary democracies. How do publics react to these concerns? And what do they believe about their own exposure to falsehoods in news? authors of a new research article ask. A comparative online survey related to election … Continued


Deepfakes do not fool people, but still undermine trust in news

So-called deepfake videos do not deceive the audience, but they increase uncertainty and thus decrease trust in news. The result is reported by Loughborough University researchers Cristian Vaccari and Andrew Chadwick. They conducted an online experiment with a statistically representative sample of the British population (N = 2 005). The participants were first asked about … Continued


ARTICLE: BBC’s senior journalists are disconnected from the public

Prominent journalists working for the British Broadcasting Corporation are very different from their audience, Gary James Merrill, of University of Roehampton, writes. He investigated the social constitution of 66 senior BBC journalists and compared them to national data. Merrill also included samples of senior Conservative and Labour politicians in the comparison. The journalists have more … Continued


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ARTICLE: Western newspapers used a cultural framework when reporting the Great East Japan Disaster

The Great East Japan Disaster of 2011 provides an important case study through which to evaluate how the western media cover Japan. Besides the nuclear crisis, limited attention has been paid to news reporting across the multiple overlapping disaster. Jamie Matthews of Bournemouth University did a critical discourse analysis of coverage of the disaster in … Continued



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ARTICLE: Data journalism producing abstract categories

The world around us is not naturally organized into categories for statistical analysis. For the purposes of data journalism, discrete, unique incidents, events, and people must be rendered as similar, so that abstract categories may be created and compared, a new study states. Wilson Lowrey and Jue Hou, of the University of Alabama, studied data … Continued


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ARTICLE: Folk theories help to explain how “news avoiders” get information

Growing numbers of people access information in other ways than by reading newspapers or accessing a news organization’s website. There’s been a shift towards so-called ‘distributed discovery’, where people find information via a range of digital intermediaries and platforms. Benjamin Toff of the University of Minnesota, and Rasmus Kleis Nielsen of the University of Oxford, … Continued


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ARTICLE: The Guardian articles written by women and people of color received a disproportionate amount of abusive comments

Compared to men, articles written by women attracted a higher percentage of inappropriate comments, new study finds. Becky Gardiner of Goldsmiths, University of London, studied blocked comments on The Guardian website. In 2006, The Guardian opened most of its articles to reader comments. While the articles were commented frequently, at the same time many journalists … Continued