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Prime Minister Tony Blair by Center for American Progress, licence CC BY-ND 2.0

ARTICLE: What affects politicians’ media reputations?

How are political leaders treated by newspapers, and how does that affect the leaders’ popularity? Daniel Stevens, of University of Exeter, and Barbara Allen, of Carleton College compared the United States and United Kingdom by examining their leaders’ press coverage and election success. The authors wanted to test three different theories. Reinforcement: opposition supporters and … Continued


Picture: Rt Hon Jeremy Corbyn, Leader of the Labour Party, UK, by Chatham House, cropped, license CC BY 2.0 & Theresa May, by Teacher Dude, cropped license CC0 1.0

REPORT: Media coverage of the UK General Election

Two main political parties dominated news about the UK General Election, states a report from Loughborough University. Researchers from Loughborough University’s Centre for Research in Communication and Culture reported on their website weekly about national news reporting on the election campaign. The reports cover the most popular television news and newspapers. The analysis focuses on … Continued


REPORT: UK media coverage of Brexit was “acrimonious and divisive”

A report by Centre for the Study of Media, Communication and Power, examines the coverage of EU referendum. The report authored by Martin Moore and Gordon Ramsay, both of King’s College London, is based on analysis of all articles published online about the EU Referendum across 20 national news outlets in the United Kingdom. Over the 10-week campaign the news outlets … Continued


Untitled by PIRO4D, licence CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Public service news are more diverse than commercial

News published online by public service broadcasters provide more diversity than news published by other types of news organisations, Edda Humprecht and Frank Esser, both of University of Zurich, write. The authors analysed 1 660 political news articles, published by 48 news organisations in six countries: United States, United Kingdom, France, Italy, Germany, and Switzerland. … Continued



Untitled by gksayaan22, licence CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Political journalists keep their Twitter profiles professional

Journalists covering parliamentary affairs in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and New Zealand have more professional than personal Twitter profiles, Folker Hanusch, of University of Vienna, writes. Hanusch analysed the identifiable profiles of all press-gallery reporters in the four countries, 679 in total. Broadly speaking, information pertinent to a corporate identity was more common than … Continued


Untitled by FreePhotosART, licence CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Data journalism epistemology in Wales, Scotland, and N-Ireland

How do data journalists lay claim to the truth? Eddy Borges-Rey, of University of Stirling, investigated the “epistemology of data journalism” in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, which he calls the “devolved nations of the United Kingdom”. Borges-Rey interviewed nine data journalists or data journalism editors who produce localized content in or for the aforementioned … Continued


Untitled by ohitisofalmighty, licence CC0 1.0

REPORT: Source protection in the UK must be strengthened

New legal and technical developments have made British journalists more vulnerable to spying by the state, a recent report states. It is based on a meeting of 25 “investigative journalists, representatives from relevant NGOs and media organisations, media lawyers and specialist researchers”. The report was prepared by the Information Law & Policy Centre, affiliated with … Continued


Untitled by klimkin, licence CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: For audience engagement, print is still king

Audiences to United Kingdom’s largest news brands still overwhelmingly consume their news via print, Neil Thurman, of both Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich and University of London, discovered. Thurman used a novel combination of audience data to compare the time spent with different news brands and delivery platforms. Eleven of UK’s largest newspaper brands were … Continued


Stopwatch by William Warby, licence CC BY 2.0

ARTICLE: No more “stopwatch” impartiality on UK television?

Major news bulletins were not – in quantitative terms – impartial during the 2015 UK General Election, write Stephen Cushion, of Cardiff University, and Richard Thomas, of both Cardiff and Leeds Trinity universities. The authors analysed the main newscasts on five TV channels during the election campaign (from March 30th to May 6th 2015), and … Continued