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ARTICLE: The Guardian articles written by women and people of color received a disproportionate amount of abusive comments

Compared to men, articles written by women attracted a higher percentage of inappropriate comments, new study finds. Becky Gardiner of Goldsmiths, University of London, studied blocked comments on The Guardian website. In 2006, The Guardian opened most of its articles to reader comments. While the articles were commented frequently, at the same time many journalists … Continued


ARTICLE: How journalists give think tanks their authority

The way journalists cite think tanks can help construct them as authoritative sources, Andrew Chadwick, of Loughborough University, writes with Declan McDowell-Naylor, Amy P. Smith and Ellen Watts, all three of Royal Holloway, University of London. The authors analysed the way British broadcasters referred to the think tank Institute of Fiscal Studies (IFS) prior to … Continued


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ARTICLE: The BBC does not live out the ideals of public service broadcasting

Independent and strong enough public service broadcasters are often seen as a defence against overly commercialized or state-captured media. The BBC has been praised as a global standard bearer in broadcast radio and television. Even though its relationship with the government and the so-called establishment is not straighforward, the company is far from being totally … Continued



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ARTICLE: Push and pull forces of mediatization

When discussing mediatization of politics, it is important to distinguish between the different actors involved. Jay G Blumler of the University of Leeds, and Frank Esser of the University of Zurich, introduce a dual perspective of mediatization. They studied the 2015 UK General Election Campaign, especially BBC interview programmes, key campaign activities and views from … Continued


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ARTICLE: Only few are likely to find themselves in an echo chamber

“The echo chamber is overstated”, declares a new research article, questioning fears of partisan segregation of people’s news sources. Elizabeth Dubois of the University of Ottawa, and Grant Blank of the University of Oxford, studied being caught in an echo chamber and the relationship between political interest and media diversity. Researchers used data from the … Continued


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ARTICLE: Science journalism has gotten worse

News articles on biomedical studies have since the year 2000 used more hyperbolic headlines and more frequently omitted replication statements, a team of University of Bordeaux researchers found. Estelle Dumas-Mallet, Andy Smith, Thomas Boraud and François Gonon analysed over 400 news stories on biomedical research, published globally between 1988 and 2009. First the authors selected … Continued


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ARTICLE: British readers spend more time with newspapers in print than online

Even though newspaper circulations have been falling and news are consumed more via smartphones, readers still spend much more time with newspapers’ print versions than with their websites and apps, a study finds. Neil Thurman of LMU Munich and City, University of London, and Richard Fletcher of the University of Oxford, compared time spent with … Continued


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ARTICLE: Do Finnish and Estonian media cower before Russia?

International news events are covered differently in different countries, but is it because of media logic or international relations? Titus Hjelm and Ülane Vaher, both of University College London, investigated the question by analysing 125 Estonian, Finnish and British news articles related to the so-called “Kohver case”. The Kohver case refers to a 2014 incident … Continued