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Whistleblowing platforms, accountability and transparency

The new study “The Accountability and Transparency of Whistleblowing Platforms Issues of Networked Journalism and Contested Boundaries” by Colin Porlezza of City, University of London and Philip di Salvo of Università della Svizzera italiana looks at how whistleblowing platforms understand accountability and transparency. Four platforms are analyzed: Magyarleaks from Hungary, Publeaks from Netherlands, Irpileaks from … Continued


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Voice-profiling and the future of journalism

How will bio-assessment of individuals affect journalism? The new article  “Journalism and the Voice Intelligence Industry” by Joseph Turow of University of Pennsylvania considers how the news people receive are affected by voice-profiling by the voice intelligence industry. The article is an essay-type one that asks the reader to also consider the future. The voice … Continued



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How people make sense of incidental news

A new study by Manuel Goyanes of University Carlos III de Madrid and Marton Demeter of National University of Public Service, Budapest, contributes to the ongoing research on incidental news consumption in social media platforms. Goyanes and Demeter studied how people make sense, how they cognitively appraise, and how they construct and perceive the effect … Continued


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How trade journals frame the use of robots

Will robots and AI take our jobs, or will they usher in an unprecedented era of prosperity, productivity, and connectedness? If trade journals are to be believed, the latter. New article by Andrew Duffy, Andrew Prahl, and Audrey Ling Yang-Hui all of Nanyang Technological University in Singapore studies how trade journals have adopted and frame … Continued


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Fewer but gendered and more positive stories about women as heads of government

Few journalism research papers up to this day have focused on women as heads of government. The new paper by Melanee Thomas of University of Calgary, Allison Harell and Tania Gosselin of UQAM, Montreal, and Sanne A.M. Rijkhoff of  Texas A&M University Corpus Christi (authors not in original order), studied how gender roles are represented … Continued


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Technologization, LGBT self-media, and the the Chinese news ecology

Increasingly, social actors from outside the journalism business, including bloggers, commentators, coders, and Web analytics managers participate in the making of news and reshape journalism. This process also includes non-human actors such as algorithms and automated systems. The new article by Yidong Wang of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Valerie Belair-Gagnon of University of Minnesota, Twin … Continued


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Eye tracking study of news interaction on Facebook

The new article by Adrian Vergara, Ignacio Siles, Ana Claudia Castro, and Alonso Chaves, all of Universidad de Costa Rica, explores how Facebook users consume news incidentally through their news feed. The study analyzed the eye movements of 41 social media users, 62% women and 38% men. Participants were university students from different majors. Facebook … Continued


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ARTICLE: When it comes to professional principles, online and offline journalists in Europe are much alike

Are online journalists different from print and broadcast colleagues when it comes to professional standards? Imke Henkel of the University of Lincoln, Neil Thurman of LMU Münich, and Judith Möller and Damian Trilling of the University of Amsterdam put this thought to test by comparing professional principles and practices among online, offline, and multiplatform journalists. … Continued