News framing of Unite the Right and Black Lives Matter protests

The study “News media framing of social protests around racial tensions during the Donald Trump presidency” by Yotam Ophir of University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Dror Walter and Virginia Massignan of Georgia State University, and Devin K Forde and Madison Neurohr of University at Buffalo, State University of New York looked at … Continued


Picture: untitled by Rolands Zilvinskis, license Unsplash

Pre-established ideas shape journalists’ news selection and framing practices

The article “Maintenance of News Frames: How US, British and Russian News Made Sense of Unfolding Events in the Syrian Chemical Weapons Crisis” by Christian Baden of Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Katsiaryna Stalpouskaya of LMU Munich compares framing of the Syrian chemical weapons crisis in newspapers from three countries.  The study defines frames according … Continued


Picture: brown mountain under cloudy sky during daytime by Rish Agarwal, license Unsplash

Framing conflict events in Pakistan

In a weak democracy like Pakistan, coverage of military, conflict events is highly reliant on military sources that are less accountable to the general public than they are in strong democracies, a new study shows.  Hussain Shabir, of Bahria University Islamabad, studied the press response to four different events in Pakistan. The events studied were … Continued



Picture: Cedar Fire crosses Interstate 15, October 2003, by United States Marine Corps, Wikimedia Commons

Major U.S. wildfires rarely framed as societal issues

“With findings that news framing is presenting a hazard only in terms of capital value when citizens suffer a multi-layered loss, scholars must question why certain frames are dominant and others nearly absent”, Carol Terracina-Hartman of the Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania writes in a new study. She examined 10 historic US wildfires using the concepts … Continued


ARTICLE: American elite uses media to manipulate public opinion

The wealthier the richest 1 per cent is, the more individualistic the news supply is – especially if rest of the population is liberal, Hamilton College researchers Ann L. Owen and Andrew Wei discovered. This corresponds with so-called “media capture” theory, which suggests the elite project their ideology through news especially when they see their … Continued



Picture: Polar bear by Andy Brunner, license CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Framing of climate change news has only limited effects to selective exposure

Framing of the stories plays only a limited role in driving exposure to climate change news, a new study finds. Lauren Feldman of Rutgers University and P. Sol Hart of the University of Michigan, conducted two news browsing experiments, testing six different climate change frames. The experiments were done with national samples of adults in … Continued


Picture: Security in Ngwom by lesley wright, license CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

ARTICLE: US television coverage of Nigeria is mostly negative

Western media coverage of Africa has long been a subject of controversy. US television news portray Nigeria mainly in a negative light, a new study by Oluseyi Adegbola and Sherice Gearhart of Texas Tech University, and Jacqueline Skarda-Mitchell of the University of Nebraska Omaha (authors not in original order), finds. Authors analyzed television coverage of … Continued


ARTICLE: Climate change reporting needs alternative frames

Environmental injustice is a key issue in understanding climate change. When discussing environmental justice, mainstream media mainly reproduces anthropocentrism, that is, a human-centric view, write Renée Moernaut, of Vrije Universiteit Brussel and University of Antwerp, Jelle Mast, of Vrije Universiteit Brussel, and Yves Pepermans, of University of Antwerp. The researchers conducted a multimodal framing analysis, looking … Continued