Freelancers – journalists or writers?

The study “The blurring line between freelance journalists and self-employed media workers” by Beate Josephi and Penny O’Donnell from University of Sydney explores the ways in which freelance journalists navigated their employment in the Covid-affected 2020. Freelancers are outside the normal confines of journalism, but recently, the perception of freelancers has begun to shift. Namely, … Continued


Maintaining journalistic identity with major mistakes

The study “The “major mea culpa:” Journalistic Discursive Techniques When Professional Norms are Broken” by Erica Salkin and Kevin Grieves from Whitworth University looked at how media organizations talk about their significant errors – errors that cannot be brushed aside simply by posting a correction. Journalism lacks a formal certification process like the one in … Continued


Ethnography of diaspora journalism

The study “Examining Diaspora Journalists’ Digital Networks and Role Perceptions: A Case Study of Syrian Post-Conflict Advocacy Journalism” by Rana Arafat from City University of London sought to understand how diaspora journalists maintain their connections to the homeland and how they advocate for human rights and political reforms from afar.  Previous research on diaspora journalism … Continued


Turnover and turnaway intention among South Korean journalists

The study “Factors Affecting Turnover and Turnaway Intention of Journalists in South Korea” by Haeyeop Song from Kunsan National University, Gunsan, Korea, and Jaemin Jung from KAIST, Daejeon, Korea applied the framework of Push-Pull-Mooring to study the factors affecting turnover and turnaway intention among South Korean newspaper journalists. Push-Pull-Mooring (PPM) is the dominant paradigm in … Continued


Investigative journalism as relational skills and epistemic resources

New study “Inventive Factfinders: Investigative Journalism as Professional Self-representation, Marker of Identity and Boundary Work” by Fredrik Bjerknes of University of Bergen is situated in the context of the annual Norwegian investigative journalism award (SKUP). Qualitative textual analysis of 44 method reports submitted to SKUP in 2018 were investigated for the study. In it, the … Continued


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Ghanaian female journalists’ work-life balance

New article “Multiskilled in Many Ways: Ghanaian Female Journalists Between Job and Home” by Kodwo Jonas Anson Boateng of University of Jyväskylä and Epp Lauk Vytautas Magnus University Kaunas investigates the challenges Ghanaian female journalists face when combining their work and family life, with gendered expectations for caregiver role. Unstructured in-depth interviews of 23 female … Continued


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Training innovators for a conservative sector

New study by Marcel Broersma of the University of Groningen and Jane Singer of City University of London describes how young journalists perceive their role and journalistic innovation and entrepreunial journalism in the quite conservative news business. Among journalists, there is a strong commitment to being a change agent, and utilizing innovation and new technology. … Continued


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Chavismo and self-censorship

In their new study, Paromita Pain and Ezequiel Korin, of the University of Nevada, studied how self-censorship has become the internalized norm for journalists starting from 1998 under the rule of Hugo Chavez, and his ideology Chavismo. The literature review shows how self-censorship exists as a continuum, ranging from explicit restrictions in authoritarian regimes to … Continued


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Technologization, LGBT self-media, and the the Chinese news ecology

Increasingly, social actors from outside the journalism business, including bloggers, commentators, coders, and Web analytics managers participate in the making of news and reshape journalism. This process also includes non-human actors such as algorithms and automated systems. The new article by Yidong Wang of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Valerie Belair-Gagnon of University of Minnesota, Twin … Continued


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Obsessive-activist reporting as a new model of journalism

In a new study, Avshalom Ginosar of Academic College Yezreel Valley, and Zvi Reich of the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, describe existing archetypes of journalists and present a new candidate: the “obsessive-activist journalist”. Following a review of literature on journalism models and role perceptions, the researchers findings are based on interviews of 17 Israeli … Continued