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ARTICLE: Push and pull forces of mediatization

When discussing mediatization of politics, it is important to distinguish between the different actors involved. Jay G Blumler of the University of Leeds, and Frank Esser of the University of Zurich, introduce a dual perspective of mediatization. They studied the 2015 UK General Election Campaign, especially BBC interview programmes, key campaign activities and views from … Continued


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ARTICLE: Only few are likely to find themselves in an echo chamber

“The echo chamber is overstated”, declares a new research article, questioning fears of partisan segregation of people’s news sources. Elizabeth Dubois of the University of Ottawa, and Grant Blank of the University of Oxford, studied being caught in an echo chamber and the relationship between political interest and media diversity. Researchers used data from the … Continued


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ARTICLE: Science journalism has gotten worse

News articles on biomedical studies have since the year 2000 used more hyperbolic headlines and more frequently omitted replication statements, a team of University of Bordeaux researchers found. Estelle Dumas-Mallet, Andy Smith, Thomas Boraud and François Gonon analysed over 400 news stories on biomedical research, published globally between 1988 and 2009. First the authors selected … Continued


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ARTICLE: British readers spend more time with newspapers in print than online

Even though newspaper circulations have been falling and news are consumed more via smartphones, readers still spend much more time with newspapers’ print versions than with their websites and apps, a study finds. Neil Thurman of LMU Munich and City, University of London, and Richard Fletcher of the University of Oxford, compared time spent with … Continued


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ARTICLE: Do Finnish and Estonian media cower before Russia?

International news events are covered differently in different countries, but is it because of media logic or international relations? Titus Hjelm and Ülane Vaher, both of University College London, investigated the question by analysing 125 Estonian, Finnish and British news articles related to the so-called “Kohver case”. The Kohver case refers to a 2014 incident … Continued



"Rt Hon Jeremy Corbyn, Leader of the Labour Party, UK", courtesy of Chatham House, licence CC BY 2.0;

ARTICLE: British press “viciously” attacked Jeremy Corbyn

The British press was highly antagonistic against Jeremy Corbyn when he was running for and got elected as the leader of the Labour Party. London School of Economics researchers Bart Cammaerts, Brooks DeCillia and João Carlos Magalhães investigated the coverage of eight national newspapers during the two months before, and two months after Corbyn’s election. … Continued



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ARTICLE: Millenials’ definition of “news” is becoming broader

The so-called Millenial generation considers as “news” a wider selection of information than what journalists and scholars usually do. This finding is reported by Natalia Rulyova, of University of Birmingham, and Hannah Westley, of The American University of Paris. The authors analysed the media diaries of 189 university students from Russia, France, United Kingdom, and … Continued