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ARTICLE: How to verify social media information?

Journalists today often utilize social media borne information in their work, especially in breaking news situations. Verifying that information, however, can be tricky. An international team of researchers interviewed 22 journalists from three countries over their verification practices, and additional five journalism students were observed during a crisis exercise. The biggest problems related to verifying … Continued


CFP JRN

CFP | 31.7. | Have digital sources changed journalism?

A special issue of Digital Journalism is calling for papers. The issue wants to showcase research that focuses or is related to one of four aspects of online sourcing in journalism. Quote from the original call: “First, we ask which online sources are most prominent within journalistic reporting, and/or whether they have replaced more traditional … Continued


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ARTICLE: Newsrooms make “Frankenstein journalism” from second-hand stories

Newsrooms have developed new rituals to legitimize the use of “second-hand” news collected from other online news outlets, write Andrew Duffy, Edson C. Tandoc and Richard Ling, all of Nanyang Technological University. The authors sent six researchers to observe eight Singaporean newsrooms for a total of over 200 hours and to interview 60 journalists. The … Continued


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ARTICLE: Politicians influence news by selecting journalists they talk to

The most important way politicians influence news is by forging ties with ideologically compatible journalists, write Peter Maurer, of Norwegian University of Science and Technology, and Markus Beiler, of Leipzig University. The authors surveyed 177 Austrian political journalists, and interviewed 10 journalists and 10 politicians. Maurer and Beiler asked the journalists about the interactions they … Continued


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ARTICLE: Magazine editors at a crossroads, when it comes to fact-checking

Websites, mobile platforms and social media have challenged magazines’ conventionally high-quality fact-checking. Susan Currie Sivek, of Linfield College and Sharon Bloyd-Peshkin, of Columbia College Chicago studied fact-checking practices applied to stories in magazines and their non-print platforms. The authors interviewed editors of 11 well-regarded magazines in the United States. The results show that practices for … Continued



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ARTICLE: Dialogical approach to representation of ethnic minorities

How could the journalistic representation of ethnic minorities be improved? Sheng Zou of Stanford University proposes a dialogical model representation, to evoke mutual understanding across differences. The author states that a a shift from “journalism of information” to “journalism of conversation” and from the “ethics of inarticulacy” to ethics of care is needed. The article … Continued


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ARTICLE: New Zealand’s media failed to build consensus about Snowden revelations

Some time after the early Snowden revelations in 2013, New Zealand implemented new surveillance reforms. Kathleen Kuehn of Victoria University of Wellington studied how Snowden’s revelations were framed. The author conducted a media framing analysis of 156 news stories from two commercial newspapers and the national public broadcaster in New Zealand. According to the results, … Continued


ARTICLE: South Korean media is highly negative toward e-cigarettes

Sei-Hill Kim, James F. Thrasher, Yoo Jin Cho and Joon Kyoung Kim, of University of South Carolina, and Myung-Hyun Kang, of Hallym University (not in original order), analysed newspaper articles and television news transcripts, to study the quantity and the nature of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) coverage in South Korea. The study also examines the sources, topics, tones etc. of … Continued


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ARTICLE: TV health news use most sources

Health news on television are more “richly sourced” than similar news on radio, in print, or online, Joyce Stroobant, Rebeca De Dobbelaer, and Karin Raeymaeckers (all of Ghent University) write. The authors analysed the health-related news pieces 35 Belgian news outlets published in February 2015 (N=981). The average number of sources used in TV health … Continued