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'198 Ways' notes by Dom Pates, licence CC BY 2.0

ARTICLE: Local audiences get less research-based journalism

Journalists who work for national audiences are more likely to use academic research and expert interviews than those who work for local or regional publications, writes John Wihbey of Northeastern University. Wihbey surveyed 1 118 journalists over their employment and their use of scholarly information. In addition to national audiences, Wihbey also discovered other factors … Continued


ARTICLE: Science news in Denmark and the UK

While the United Kingdom media market is large, open and complex, science news in Denmark works under different conditions, write Gunver Lystbaek Vestergaard and Kristian Hvidtfelt Nielsen, of Aarhus University. They compare science news in the UK and Denmark in order to locate small versus large country anomalies through content analysis. Results show that UK … Continued


ARTICLE: Science journalism headlines over-the-top

The headlines of science stories are often excessively emotive and exeggeratory, writes Katarzyna Molek-Kozakowska, of Opole University. The author studied the headlines of 400 most-read stories published on the website of the science magazine New Scientist. According to Molek-Kozakowska, the headlines mostly resemble the popular journalistic style rather than scientific style. This entails eye-catching, enthusing, … Continued


ARTICLE: News on science increase trust in science

The people who consume more news about science are more trustful of it, even if said news told about misconduct in science, writes Ulrika Andersson of University of Gothenburg. The author compared the news consumption patterns and levels of trust in science to the amount of negative science news in Sweden’s largest news outlets. The … Continued


ARTICLE: Journalist-scientist relationships, through field theory

The relationships between journalists and scientists are various, but explainable through Pierre Bourdieu’s field theory, writes Jannie Møller Hartley, of Roskilde University. The author interviewed both journalists and scientists, and found a dynamic in which the “dominated” in one field ally with the “dominant” of the other. Hartley found that there are scientists with poor … Continued


REPORT: Talking about science and badgers

The news stories surrounding a controversial badger cull made use of only a small circle of select scientists, writes Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism (RISJ) fellow and BBC journalist Helen Briggs. Briggs studied some 160 articles, columns and editorials published in UK newspapers regarding the topic. The author also conducted interviews with both … Continued


ARTICLE: Science journalists call nano-tech uncertain

Most science journalists depict nano scale technology (NST) as uncertain in nature. A smaller fraction uses the on-the-other-hand or the downright optimistic approach. The results come from Lars Guenther, Klara Froehlich and Georg Ruhrmann, all of Friedrich Schiller University Jena. They interviewed some 20-odd German science journalists over the reasons behind their reporting styles. The … Continued