ARTICLE: Calling minor gaffes scandals hurts journalism’s credibility

When journalists try to exaggerate and scandalize a small transgression, they undermine the public’s trust in journalism, a team of Radboud University researchers discovered. Paul Graβl, Gabi Schaap, Flavia Spagnuolo and Jonathan Van ’t Riet conducted an experiment with 128 Dutch university students, where the participants read different kinds of news articles and assessed both … Continued


ARTICLE: News about Donald Trump’s presidency make readers unhappy

Following the coverage of the first ten months of Donald Trump‘s presidency made American citizens feel negative emotions. María Celeste Wagner, of University of Pennsylvania, and Pablo J. Boczkowski, of Northwestern University, interviewed 71 Americans over their experiences following news at that time. The interviews quickly turned to president Trump in specific. Most commonly the … Continued


Picture: What’s going on here by John Schnobrich, license CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: How advertising tech firms see fake news, and how this affects the business of journalism

Different online marketing platforms and programmatic advertising has made it possible to profit from producing fake news. On the other hand, also legitimate news organizations use this infrastructure and the same tools for their livelihood. Joshua A. Braun and Jessica L. Eklund, of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, wanted to find out how the programmatic … Continued



Picture: Euromaidan 19 February 9 by ВО Свобода, license CC BY 3.0

ARTICLE: The coverage of the Ukraine conflict in 13 European countries

The crisis in Ukraine in 2014 was covered in varying ways around Europe. A group of researchers did a content analysis for coverage on the conflict from the first half of 2014. All in all, they examined two newspapers (24 issues from each paper) from 13 countries: Albania, Czech Republic, Germany, Latvia, the Netherlands, Poland, … Continued


Picture: Palais de la Nation Bruxelles by Oakenchips, license CC BY-SA 3.0

ARTICLE: Interpretive journalism on government negotiations has risen significantly in Belgium

The amount of interpretive political journalism has risen steadily in Belgium over the years, a study finds. Karolin Soontjens of the University of Antwerp, studied newspaper coverage on coalition negotiations in Belgium, conducting a content analysis for news articles between 1985 and 2014. The author analysed a total of 1 342 articles from two Flemish newspapers, … Continued



Picture: = // = by Antony Theobald, license CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

ARTICLE: Colombian media shapes people’s perceptions of income inequality

David Coppini of the University of Denver, and German Alvarez and Hernando Rojas, both of the University of Wisconsin, studied the relationship between media exposure, perceptions of inequality, and political outcomes. They did a survey for a representative sample of the Colombian adult population (n = 1 031). News consumption had a negative relationship with perceptions … Continued


Picture: John Howard on 4 february 2003 by US Department of Defense, license CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Examining the hybrid media system and politics in Australia

Australia’s Prime Minister John Howard’s (1996–2007) use of talk back radio and YouTube were pivotal in the trend towards ‘disintermediation’ in Australian politics, a new study states. Caroline Fisher, David Marshall and Kerry McCallum, of the University of Canberra, examined mediatization of politics and hybrid media logic in Australia. As data for the research, authors … Continued