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ARTICLE: Legacy media still have the strongest online audience overlap in the US and UK

A new study by Subhayan Mukerjee and Sandra González-Bailón of the University of Pennsylvania, and Sílvia Majó-Vázquez of the University of Oxford (authors not in original order), created a novel way to find out how people consume news online. Researchers tracked the browsing behaviour of web users and looked at the networks they form while … Continued


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ARTICLE: US national discourse has constructed China as a potential enemy ‘Other’

China is arguably the most important partner and rival for the United States. Su-Mei Ooi of Butler University, and Gwen D’Arcangelis of Skidmore College, look at the US news and political discourse about China, and how China is being ‘othered’. The researchers analyzed official policy documents, statistics and other texts along with news media articles … Continued


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PAPER: Right-wing supporters shared the most fake and junk news in the US

Who reads and shares most junk news? Researchers studied social media distribution of so-called junk news websites in the United States, during three months, between 20 October 2017 and 19 January 2018. On Twitter, a network of “Trump supporters” shared the widest range of known junk news sources, a data memo by the University of … Continued


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ARTICLE: Push and pull forces of mediatization

When discussing mediatization of politics, it is important to distinguish between the different actors involved. Jay G Blumler of the University of Leeds, and Frank Esser of the University of Zurich, introduce a dual perspective of mediatization. They studied the 2015 UK General Election Campaign, especially BBC interview programmes, key campaign activities and views from … Continued



ARTICLE: TV and search engines people’s first choices for political information

Where do people choose to get political information, and how much do they learn from it? Researchers analyzed data from a national sample of U.S. adults from 2011 and 2012, measuring for political knowledge of the respondents. Internet searches have come to rival television news as a source of political information, the authors state. 35% … Continued


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ARTICLE: Only few are likely to find themselves in an echo chamber

“The echo chamber is overstated”, declares a new research article, questioning fears of partisan segregation of people’s news sources. Elizabeth Dubois of the University of Ottawa, and Grant Blank of the University of Oxford, studied being caught in an echo chamber and the relationship between political interest and media diversity. Researchers used data from the … Continued


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ARTICLE: Russia frames itself as a stabilizing force in the world

How does Russia’s state-controlled and state-affiliated media frame the country’s role in the world? Robert S. Hinck, of Monmouth College, with Randolph Kluver and Skye Cooley, both of Oklahoma State University, analysed hundreds of Russian television and online news stories related to a number of international topics. Sometimes the coverage presents contradictory details, but the … Continued


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BOOK: Modern world needs collaborative journalism, but it is not a panacea

The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism has published a new open access book on collaboration in investigative journalism. The book is edited by Richard Sambrook, of Oxford University, and features chapters from five other writers. Collaborative journalism is not entirely new: newsrooms teamed up already in late 1800’s in order to pool resources … Continued


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ARTICLE: Social media does not increase political knowledge

Using social media for political information does not actually help the audience learn anything about politics, Adam Shehata and Jesper Strömbäck, both of University of Gothenburg, write. The authors analysed data from two multi-wave surveys, together consisting of responses from over 4 500 Swedes. In both surveys, the respondents were first asked to fill in … Continued