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ARTICLE: Media coverage of Islam may affect radicalization

The way news cover Islam and Muslims has the potential to increase or decrease the likelihood of Islamist radicalization, an experiment conducted at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich suggests. Katharina Neumann, Florian Arendt and Philip Baugut first interviewed six former extremists (e.g. ISIS members), and then conducted a laboratory experiment with 194 self-identified Muslims … Continued


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ARTICLE: Perceptions of audience shaping Al Jazeera’s news

What do journalists imagine their audiences are like, and how does this affect their work? Julian Matthews of the University of Leicester, and Maiya Al Habsi of Al-Bayan College, studied the topic in a non-national and more global context. They examined news professionals’ perceptions of the Arab news audience at Al Jazeera, and how it … Continued


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ARTICLE: Legacy media still have the strongest online audience overlap in the US and UK

A new study by Subhayan Mukerjee and Sandra González-Bailón of the University of Pennsylvania, and Sílvia Majó-Vázquez of the University of Oxford (authors not in original order), created a novel way to find out how people consume news online. Researchers tracked the browsing behaviour of web users and looked at the networks they form while … Continued


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PAPER: Recognizing fake news can be effectively crowdsourced

The volume of inaccurate or false information is too much to filter by designated fact-checkers, Gordon Pennycook and David G. Rand, both of Yale University, argue. Could the task, then, be crowdsourced? Pennycook and Rand conducted an online experiment with 1 010 Americans by asking them to rate the trustworthiness of 60 news sources. The … Continued



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ARTICLE: Only few are likely to find themselves in an echo chamber

“The echo chamber is overstated”, declares a new research article, questioning fears of partisan segregation of people’s news sources. Elizabeth Dubois of the University of Ottawa, and Grant Blank of the University of Oxford, studied being caught in an echo chamber and the relationship between political interest and media diversity. Researchers used data from the … Continued


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ARTICLE: Photographs amplify news of danger, but not positive messages

Is a picture really worth a thousand words? Edmund W. J. Lee and Shirley S. Ho, both of Nanyang Technological University, studied the question through an experiment with 445 Singaporean university students. The participants were shown news stories about either nuclear power or nanotechnology. Some of the stories included photographs while others were text-only. Further, … Continued


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ARTICLE: Social media does not increase political knowledge

Using social media for political information does not actually help the audience learn anything about politics, Adam Shehata and Jesper Strömbäck, both of University of Gothenburg, write. The authors analysed data from two multi-wave surveys, together consisting of responses from over 4 500 Swedes. In both surveys, the respondents were first asked to fill in … Continued


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ARTICLE: When news are distant, stories shared by friends and newspapers are as credible

What makes news seem credible on social media? Edson C. Tandoc Jr., of Nanyang Technological University, researched the question through an experiment with 82 Singaporean university students. The participants each read two (fake) news articles shared to them on Facebook. The articles were shared by either the prestigious Singaporean newspaper The Strait Times or personal … Continued