Untitled by Khusen Rustamov, licence CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Australian papers prioritize business over nature

The discourse surrounding the protection of the Great Barrier Reef has become increasingly business-oriented in Australian newspapers, Kerrie Foxwell-Norton, of Griffith University, and Claire Konkes, of University of Tasmania, write. The authors compared the topic’s coverage in four newspapers in 1981 and 2012. Foxwell-Norton and Konkes’ sample focused on two important events of mediatized environmental … Continued


Picture: At the launch of ABC Open at Parliament House (4 Feb 2010) by Maxine McKew, license CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

ARTICLE: The ABC Open project has managed to emphasize reciprocity

Previous research has argued that journalists involved in participatory projects have exercised too much control over the publication of user-generated content. Bill Reader of Ohio University, examined the Australian participatory project ABC Open. He did a textual analysis of 297 ‘how-to’ guides and conducted an online survey for the producers. The author found that the … Continued


Picture: John Howard on 4 february 2003 by US Department of Defense, license CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Examining the hybrid media system and politics in Australia

Australia’s Prime Minister John Howard’s (1996–2007) use of talk back radio and YouTube were pivotal in the trend towards ‘disintermediation’ in Australian politics, a new study states. Caroline Fisher, David Marshall and Kerry McCallum, of the University of Canberra, examined mediatization of politics and hybrid media logic in Australia. As data for the research, authors … Continued


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ARTICLE: Science journalism has gotten worse

News articles on biomedical studies have since the year 2000 used more hyperbolic headlines and more frequently omitted replication statements, a team of University of Bordeaux researchers found. Estelle Dumas-Mallet, Andy Smith, Thomas Boraud and François Gonon analysed over 400 news stories on biomedical research, published globally between 1988 and 2009. First the authors selected … Continued


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ARTICLE: Teachers avoid journalists due to negative coverage

Including teachers’ voices in news about education would be beneficial, yet Australian teachers are reluctant to give interviews, Kathryn Shine, of Curtin University, writes. Shine interviewed 25 teachers and principals from around Australia, asking about their attitudes towards journalists and news on education. Almost all interviewees saw news on education as being overly negative and … Continued


Refugees on a boat, photograph courtesy of U.S. Navy, licence CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Australian press depictions of asylum seekers polarized

Australian newspapers portray asylum seekers either as “victims requiring management” or as a “threat requiring military intervention”. Researchers from the Australian Deakin University, Kehla Lippi, Fiona H. McKay and Hayley J. McKenzie, analysed the representations of asylum seekers in six major newspapers, published by two companies. The period under study covered the month before and … Continued


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ARTICLE: Lifestyle journalists are not all the same

The role conceptions of lifestyle journalists vary according to their specialization, Folker Hanusch, of University of Vienna, writes. The author surveyed 616 Australian lifestyle journalists over how important they saw certain aspects of their work. Hanusch’s study recognizes four professional role conceptions: the “Service Provider”, “Life Coach”, “Community Advocate” and the “Inspiring Entertainer”. Out of … Continued


Picture: untitled by Volkan Olmez, license CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Changing coverage of violence against women

Violence against women in Australia has largely been reported as isolated events, not as a social problem requiring society-wide response. Article by Jenny Morgan, of the University of Melbourne, and Margaret Simons, of Monash University, interviewed journalists in two Australian newsrooms, which both had campaigned for social change on the issue. From the interviews, researchers … Continued


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ARTICLE: Social media users have more varied news diets

Social media users engage with more news sources per week than non-users do, write Richard Fletcher and Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, both of University of Oxford. The authors analysed survey data from Italy, Australia, United Kingdom and United States, gathered originally for the 2015 Reuters Institute’s Digital News Report. The respondents were divided into three groups … Continued


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ARTICLE: Australian journalists are not equipped to resist surveillance

Australian journalists “lack understanding” of the risks posed to them and their sources by state-sanctioned surveillance, Benedetta Brevini, of University of Sydney, writes. The author reviews the trend in Australian surveillance policy post-9/11 and supplements the analysis with the interviews of 10 journalists. Recently imposed laws can have a significant chilling effect on journalism seeking … Continued