CFP: Constructing constructive journalism

The conference Constructed|Constructive Journalism is now open for submission proposals. The event itself will take place at Brussels, Belgium on the 8th and 9th of December 2016. The conference is organized by the Vrije Universiteit Brussel and hosted by the Academy of Flanders. The conference considers two different meanings of the word “construct”: that of … Continued


ARTICLE: “Dirty” TV news are harder to follow

Television news that present a lot of on-screen visual elements are harder to remember correctly, write Rui Rodrigues, of Instituto Superior Miguel Torga, and Ana Veloso and Óscar Mealha, both of University of Aveiro. The authors presented 80 university students with different versions of the same newscast, tracked their eye movements, and had them answer … Continued


ARTICLE: Consumers seek like-minded audiences

When consuming news online people tend to select sources that have like minded audiences, writes Shira Dvir-Gvirsman, of Tel Aviv University. The author conducted two separate studies: First a sample of Israelis were surveyed with regard to their political opinions both before and after national elections, and their online activities were recorded for seven weeks. … Continued


ARTICLE: Readers’ and journalists’ interests diverge

The journalists and readers of the newspaper The Guardian prefer different topics in human trafficking related news, write Maria Eirini Papadouka, Nicholas Evangelopoulos and Gabe Ignatow, all of University of North Texas. The authors analyzed the specific themes of The Guardian‘s news on human trafficking and the subjects of readers’ comments posted in conjunction to … Continued


ARTICLE: MPs do not react the same to all news

Negative news regarding a politician’s own party’s pet issue is more likely than others to inspire him or her to act, writes Luzia Helfer, of Leiden University. The author asked members of the Swiss parliament to read manipulated news stories and evaluate whether they would take action based on the story. Several factors affected the … Continued


ARTICLE: Quality press increases voter turnout

Exposure to high quality newspapers increases voter turnout in elections, write Florian Arendt, of University of Munich, and Cornelia Brandtner, of Dresden University of Technology. The authors studied 460 Austrians’ media use and voting behaviour by a two-wave panel survey before and after the 2014 Europarliamentary elections. According to Arendt and Brandtner, exposure to one … Continued



ARTICLE: Journalists reel back on social media

Journalists are decreasing their efforts to engage with their audience on Facebook, writes Anders Olof Larsson, of Westerdals Oslo School of Arts, Communication and Technology. Larsson algorithmically captured the activities on the Facebook pages of four large, Swedish newspapers over five years’ time (from 2010 to 2015). Over the studied time period, journalists’ engagement declined … Continued


ARTICLE: News on science increase trust in science

The people who consume more news about science are more trustful of it, even if said news told about misconduct in science, writes Ulrika Andersson of University of Gothenburg. The author compared the news consumption patterns and levels of trust in science to the amount of negative science news in Sweden’s largest news outlets. The … Continued


ARTICLE: Social media use good for democracy

The use of social media, even for non-political purposes, increases political deliberation, write Trevor Dieh and Homero Gil de Zúñiga, both of University of Vienna, and Brian Weeks, of University of Michigan (names not in original order). The authors used a two-wave survey to compare people’s social media use patterns to their activity in political … Continued