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ARTICLE: Framing of nationally and locally sensitive issues in China

Sensitivity of news is expected to influence news framing significantly, write Xianwen Kuang and Rining Wei, both of Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University. The authors choose two sensitive political issues with different geographic relevance and explore the frame use of three party and three nonparty newspapers in China. The study confirms the assumption that the framing of nationally sensitive … Continued


"Rt Hon Jeremy Corbyn, Leader of the Labour Party, UK", courtesy of Chatham House, licence CC BY 2.0;

ARTICLE: British press “viciously” attacked Jeremy Corbyn

The British press was highly antagonistic against Jeremy Corbyn when he was running for and got elected as the leader of the Labour Party. London School of Economics researchers Bart Cammaerts, Brooks DeCillia and João Carlos Magalhães investigated the coverage of eight national newspapers during the two months before, and two months after Corbyn’s election. … Continued


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ARTICLE: Newspapers’ front pages have less news than before

American newspapers’ front pages have become more magazine-like since 1988, Miki Tanikawa, of Akita International University, writes. Tanikawa analysed a sample of three newspapers’ front pages from between 1988 and 2013. The sample covered The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, and the International Herald Tribune. Over time, the number of “straight news” declined on … Continued




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ARTICLE: Length of articles and size of newspapers affect diversity of content

Diversity of news content can be regarded as an indicator of the quality of reporting. In a new article, a group of researchers figured out what factors determine diversity of news. The paper studied newspaper articles concerning immigration in Belgium, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom between January 2013 and April 2014. Researchers measured diversity … Continued


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ARTICLE: Dutch papers don’t rely too heavily on press releases

In a new study, Jelle Boumans of the University of Amsterdam took a look on how press releases impact news content in the Netherlands. Boumans used automated content analysis on 4455 press releases between 2004-2013 and examined how press releases about different corporations and NGOs are used in Dutch newspapers and by news agencies. Boumans’ … Continued


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ARTICLE: What’s keeping newspapers from fully engaging social media?

Mainstream newspapers in Finland, Japan and Korea have one thing in common: they all seem to under-utilize social media in their operation. The reasons, however, are different for each country, write Joo-Young Jung, of International Christian University, and Mikko Villi, of University of Jyväskylä. The authors interviewed 18 senior journalists working for 14 different mainstream … Continued


Prime Minister Tony Blair by Center for American Progress, licence CC BY-ND 2.0

ARTICLE: What affects politicians’ media reputations?

How are political leaders treated by newspapers, and how does that affect the leaders’ popularity? Daniel Stevens, of University of Exeter, and Barbara Allen, of Carleton College compared the United States and United Kingdom by examining their leaders’ press coverage and election success. The authors wanted to test three different theories. Reinforcement: opposition supporters and … Continued


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ARTICLE: Tabloidization has increased, but only modestly

German and Austrian elite newspapers have become more tabloid-like since 1949, Melanie Magin, of University of Mainz, writes. Magin analysed the election coverage of seven papers from between 1949 and 2009, manually coding just over 10 000 news pieces. In some respect, tabloidization has remained at a constant level throughout the years, the author discovered. … Continued