REPORT: Twitter subcultures are wary of journalism

How do different subcultures interact with, and react to, mainstream journalism on Twitter? A team of American researchers investigated the matter through three American Twitter-spheres: “Black”, “Feminist” and “Asian-American Twitter”. The researchers analysed over 44 million Twitter messages which bore certain subculture-related hashtags, e.g. #blacklivesmatter, #girlslikeus and #freshofftheboat, respectively. In addition, 45 people were interviewed … Continued



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ARTICLE: Parents and social media influence racial resentment attitudes of millenial youth

What is the connection between media use and racial resentment? Angie Maxwell and Stephanie R. Schulte of the University of Arkansas studied racial resentment attitudes among white Millennial youth in the US. They used a part of a national survey of parents and children prior to the 2012 US presidential elections. From 613 responses, researchers … Continued


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ARTICLE: National policies affect terrorism coverage

National policies affect the way major broadcasters cover politically motivated violence, write Ying Roselyn Du, of Hong Kong Baptist University, and Lulu Li, of Chinese University of Hong Kong. The authors analysed 142 news stories on terrorist attacks, published online by the Chinese CCTV and the American CNN. The authors searched for news on two … Continued


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ARTICLE: The effect of format and source type on how people select news

A growing competition for audiences and the proliferation of new sources, sometimes less credible, have changed how people read news. Are the concerns over news consumption specific to the medium on which people get their news? ask George D.H. Pearson and Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick of the Ohio State University. The researchers looked for differing patterns of … Continued


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ARTICLE: Journalism job postings demand an increasing repertoire of skills

The required skill sets for people working in journalism are continually expanding. At the same time, career prospects of journalism students exceed the usual meanings of “journalism” work. Deb Halpern Wenger and Jason Cain of the University of Mississippi, and Lynn C. Owens of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (authors not in … Continued


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ARTICLE: US newspapers focus on mass shooters, not their victims

American newspapers’ front pages show more pictures of mass shooters than their victims, Nicole Smith Dahmen, of University of Oregon, writes. Dahmen studied the photographs on 3 821 front pages, published after three separate mass shootings. The mass shootings selected for the sample were the Virginia Tech shooting (2007), Sandy Hook elementary school shooting (2012) … Continued


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ARTICLE: Americans are not that interested in fake news, after all

Few Americans are deeply invested in consuming so-called fake news, Jacob L. Nelson, of Northwestern University, and Harsh Taneja, of University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, write. The authors analysed the browsing data collected from one million Americans before and after the 2016 presidential elections. Nelson and Taneja compared online traffic to established news websites (e.g. New … Continued


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PAPER: Recognizing fake news can be effectively crowdsourced

The volume of inaccurate or false information is too much to filter by designated fact-checkers, Gordon Pennycook and David G. Rand, both of Yale University, argue. Could the task, then, be crowdsourced? Pennycook and Rand conducted an online experiment with 1 010 Americans by asking them to rate the trustworthiness of 60 news sources. The … Continued