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ARTICLE: Journalists report suicide with caution, but also deviate from guidelines

Writing on the topic of suicide can have serious consequences for the reading public. Michael Mead Yaqub, Randal A Beam and Sue Lockett John, all of the University of Washington, interviewed 50 journalists in the United States about their awareness of and attitudes towards suicide, especially on risks related to reporting and US media recommendations. … Continued


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ARTICLE: Too much focus on technology in journalism education?

With a constantly changing industry, a challenge for journalism educators is how to prepare future journalists with the skills they need. Patrick Ferrucci, of the University of Colorado Boulder, interviewed 29 full-time veteran digital journalists in the United States to find out how they perceive current journalism education and the skills of new entrants to … Continued


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ARTICLE: How do French and American journalists use social media?

Work practices and interactions with peers influence how journalists use social media. Matthew Powers, of the University of Washington, and Sandra Vera-Zambrano, of Universidad Iberoamericana, examined journalists’ use of social media in France and United States. They interviewed 60 journalists from Seattle and Toulouse. Journalists in both countries perform similar routine tasks in social media: … Continued


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ARTICLE: Newspapers’ front pages have less news than before

American newspapers’ front pages have become more magazine-like since 1988, Miki Tanikawa, of Akita International University, writes. Tanikawa analysed a sample of three newspapers’ front pages from between 1988 and 2013. The sample covered The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, and the International Herald Tribune. Over time, the number of “straight news” declined on … Continued



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ARTICLE: Consuming news from multiple platforms is good for civic engagement

Logan Molyneux, of Temple University, examined how civically engaged individuals consume various types of news content across multiple platforms. The data was collected using an online survey for US adults, 1500 participants answering questions about their news consumption habits, civic and political participation, and demographic information. The study asked about the use of six platforms: … Continued


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ARTICLE: Political news sites attract ideologically diverse audiences

Partisan selective exposure to news or echo chambers seems not to be the main driver for political polarization, a new study finds. Researchers Jacob L. Nelson and James G. Webster, of Northwestern University, studied audience behaviour on political news sites in the United States. They used comScore data tracking audiences’ behaviours, looking at ideological profiles … Continued


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ARTICLE: Fear of surveillance causes journalists to change their ways

The threat of governmental surveillance, or the “Big Brother feeling”, causes journalists to change their behaviour both in their work life and in private. Stephenson Waters, of University of Florida, interviewed seven American journalists, who are specialized in reporting on national security issues. None of Waters’ interviewees had any evidence of personally being monitored, but … Continued