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ARTICLE: Analytics tools rationalize journalistic work while creating a compelling user experience

How do analytics rationalize journalistic work? Rutgers University researcher Caitlin Petre spent six months at the newsroom analytics company Chartbeat doing ethnographic observation and interviews. The author looked at discursive strategies and design elements used by the company to influence journalists’ views on the issue. The newsroom analytics dashboard differs from a “Taylorist” stopwatch in … Continued


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ARTICLE: The Guardian articles written by women and people of color received a disproportionate amount of abusive comments

Compared to men, articles written by women attracted a higher percentage of inappropriate comments, new study finds. Becky Gardiner of Goldsmiths, University of London, studied blocked comments on The Guardian website. In 2006, The Guardian opened most of its articles to reader comments. While the articles were commented frequently, at the same time many journalists … Continued


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ARTICLE: People navigate news on social media based on ‘generalised scepticism’

As news are read more often via social media, the selection of what news people see is based increasingly on algorithms, instead of editorial selection. Richard Fletcher and Rasmus Kleis Nielsen of Oxford University, studied how people navigate news on social media, focusing on how they perceive news selection. The authors did a two-part study. … Continued


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ARTICLE: Politically active people in Taiwan still read print newspapers

Tien-Tsung Lee of the University of Kansas, and Yuki Fujioka of Georgia State University analyzed data from the Taiwan Communication Survey (TCS) from 2013, looking at which news and information sources are connected to civic and political participation. Their sample included 2 000 Taiwanese adults. Print newspaper reading was positively associated with both online and offline … Continued



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ARTICLE: Balancing between new media ethos and religious norms

Changes in mainstream media and online journalism have also affected religious communities. For example, many Jewish ultra-Orthodox news websites have been launched over the past ten years. Oren Golan and Nakhi Mishol-Shauli of the University of Haifa, studied religious web journalists and how they view their work. The authors interviewed 40 journalists of Haredi news … Continued


PAPER: News stories’ heroes and villains can be detected automatically

The way different actors are framed in news stories is an important part of news literacy, a team of Northwestern University researchers posits. Analysing each story carefully enough to detect these frames, however, is a tall order for the average reader. In order to assist critical reading, Diego Gomez-Zara, Miriam Boon and Larry Birnbaum have … Continued


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ARTICLE: Journalists are willing to engage with online commenters, but take action to limit the influence

The relationship between online commenters and journalists has been a tricky one. News organizations are struggling with how to allow for audience autonomy while still holding on to power and journalistic authority. J. David Wolfgang of Colorado State University researched how journalists attempt to frame commenting and its role alongside journalism. He did 1) a … Continued


ARTICLE: Automated news recommendation can be as good as human editors

Is automated news recommendation a threat to content diversity, leading to audience getting trapped inside “filter bubbles”? Judith Möller, Damian Trilling and Natali Helberger, all of University of Amsterdam, with Bram van Es, of eScience Center, investigated the question through a statistical simulation. The authors used a sample of almost 22 000 news articles published … Continued


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ARTICLE: Americans are not that interested in fake news, after all

Few Americans are deeply invested in consuming so-called fake news, Jacob L. Nelson, of Northwestern University, and Harsh Taneja, of University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, write. The authors analysed the browsing data collected from one million Americans before and after the 2016 presidential elections. Nelson and Taneja compared online traffic to established news websites (e.g. New … Continued