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ARTICLE: Acquiring digital capital is important but gendered

Digital capital, i.e. information and communication technology skills and knowledge, is important in the struggle for power in journalism, increasing journalists’ chances for recruitment and advancement. Sara De Vuyst and Karin Raeymaeckers, of Ghent University, conducted 24 interviews with a cross-national sample to find out whether and how digital capital is gendered in journalism. Digital … Continued


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ARTICLE: Political news sites attract ideologically diverse audiences

Partisan selective exposure to news or echo chambers seems not to be the main driver for political polarization, a new study finds. Researchers Jacob L. Nelson and James G. Webster, of Northwestern University, studied audience behaviour on political news sites in the United States. They used comScore data tracking audiences’ behaviours, looking at ideological profiles … Continued


Data exchange in news apps – Aske Kammer interview

VIDEO: With whom do news apps share their data with?

Aske Kammer, Assistant Professor at IT University Copenhagen, told us about his research paper presented at NordMedia 2017. Kammer has investigated news applications for smartphones, and how data is exchanged between the apps and third-party actors, such as Facebook and Google. Preliminary findings show that news apps have many third-party actors who they exchange data … Continued



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ARTICLE: Millenials’ definition of “news” is becoming broader

The so-called Millenial generation considers as “news” a wider selection of information than what journalists and scholars usually do. This finding is reported by Natalia Rulyova, of University of Birmingham, and Hannah Westley, of The American University of Paris. The authors analysed the media diaries of 189 university students from Russia, France, United Kingdom, and … Continued


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PAPER: Design and features on news websites can affect perceived bias

With news websites increasingly adapting to individual users, the experience of each user is becoming more tailored. User characteristics, website design and technical features of websites impact users’ perception of bias, a new conference paper finds. Brendan Spillane, Séamus Lawless and Vincent Wade, of Trinity College, Dublin, did an experiment using eight different kind of … Continued


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ARTICLE: Live-blogged news are harder to follow

Live-blogging is an increasingly popular, speedy genre of online news delivery. The format, however, is more difficult to follow than the traditional “inverted pyramid”, Angela Lee, of University of Texas at Dallas, writes. Lee conducted an online experiment with 220 Americans, in which they were presented with either live-blogged or inverted pyramid versions of news … Continued


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ARTICLE: Objectivity must be re-evaluated in the digital era

How the concept of objectivity should be seen in the digital era full of varying sources of information? Brian McNair, of Queensland University of Technology, argues how objectivity can and must be re-evaluated, deriving from the work of Michael Schudson. In the current times, a measure for informational validity is crucial. “The journalistic search for … Continued


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ARTICLE: Newsgames are imperfect, but have their uses

Both proponents and detractors of newsgames “exaggerate” their impact, write Christoph Plewe, of Free University of Berlin, and Elfriede Fürsich, of University of Pittsburgh. They analysed three refugee or migration related newsgames: The Refugee Challenge, Against All Odds and The Migrant Trail. All three games make an appeal to sympathize with the migrants, and thus … Continued


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ARTICLE: Who sets the international news agenda?

Wealthy countries have a big influence in deciding how other countries perceive the world. Lei Guo, of Boston University, and Chris J. Vargo, of University of Colorado Boulder, studied global intermedia agenda setting and the flow of international news. Using the GDELT open source data, researchers conducted a big data analysis of about 54 million … Continued