Picture: Sand dust explosion by 11891922, license Pixabay

ARTICLE: Gatekeeping news after publication

Gatekeeping processes online are changing constantly and being affected by so-called secondary gatekeepers. The new article by Alfred Hermida of the University of British Columbia, presents a conceptual framework on the topic. It examines how news items gain attention in the circulation phase: what gatekeeping processes take place after publication. These processes can be observed, … Continued


Picture: untitled by Priscilla Du Breez, license CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: “News-finds-me” perception is linked to social media use and political knowledge across countries

Social media has become the most important news source for many, and its use for finding news has increased tremendously over the past years. The “news finds me” perception (NFM) refers to the idea some have, that due to the vast amount of information available online and in social media, they don’t have to actively … Continued


Seeing news in a foreign language can stoke racial resentment

The language of news articles can increase racial resentment or -depending on the person- feelings of belonging. The findings come from two online experiments with White Americans (n=620) and supposed Hispanics living in the United States (n=362). In both experiments the participants were shown a total of nine news articles, dealing with politics, sports and … Continued


ARTICLE: Country images are shaped by news sources, not by content

Reading negative or positive news of a particular country alone does not affect the reader’s image of that country. The surprising result was discovered by Chen Yang, of Robert Morris University, and Gi Woong Yun, of University of Nevada. The authors conducted an online experiment with 172 American university students. The participants were directed to … Continued


ARTICLE: Journalists still prefer traditional audience metrics

American journalists still find page views and social sharing to be the most useful audience metrics. Valerie Belair-Gagnon, Rodrigo Zamith and Avery E. Holton surveyed 520 American newspaper, magazine and online journalists. The authors represent the universities of Minnesota, Massachusetts Amherst, and Utah, respectively. Aside from the journalists’ metric preference, the authors wanted to investigate … Continued


ARTICLE: Online experiments can indicate audience preferences like field research does

Does an experimental setting affect news audiences’ behaviour? The question is a relevant concern to researchers who consider sending participants to a mock news website as part of their methodology: if the knowledge of taking part in a study affects the participants’ behaviour, the method is not externally valid. University of Texas at Austin researchers … Continued


ARTICLE: Most media inform better than mobile news apps

Citizens gain more political knowledge from almost any other news media than mobile news applications, a study on Danes discovered. Jakob Ohme, of University of Amsterdam, conducted a large-scale survey during the 2015 Danish election campaign. Over 9 000 people participated in the study, but only 1 108 completed both pre- and post-election surveys and … Continued


ARTICLE: Newsrooms neglect WhatsApp’s interactive potential

Few German newsrooms use the messaging application WhatsApp and even fewer use it for interaction with their audience. Karin Boczek and Lars Koppers, both of Technical University Dortmund, investigated newsrooms’ WhatsApp use in the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. The 17 million inhabitants of North Rhine-Westphalia are served by 78 newsrooms. Only 39 of them … Continued


ARTICLE: Data does not make news credible, but data visualization does

News articles that cite numbers are no more credible to the audience than stories without them, an experiment with Hongkonger university students indicates. Y. Roselyn Du, Lingzi Zhu and Benjamin K. L. Cheng, all of Hong Kong Baptist University, presented 257 students with one version of a news article: either one citing exact numbers, one … Continued