Young woman reading newspaper at Ohio Univeristy, 1980, photo courtesy of Ohio University Libraries, licence CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

ARTICLE: African American papers invest in online presence and free circulation

The paid circulation of African American newspapers has since 1993 declined, and they are instead circulated increasingly as freesheets, write Stephen Lacy and Daniel Krier, both of Michigan State University, with Sandra L. Combs, of Arkansas State University (names not in original order). The authors gleaned data regarding African American papers from the Editor & … Continued


Picture: Wall Street Journal Corporate Headquarters by John Wisniewski, license CC BY-ND 2.0

ARTICLE: Change of ownership increased political content in the front pages of Wall Street Journal

Relatively more political stories were being promoted after Rupert Murdoch took over the Wall Street Journal (WSJ), a study by Allison M. Archer, of the University of Richmond, and Joshua Clinton, of Vanderbilt University, shows. They examined how ownership influences media behavior by researching the impact of Murdoch’s purchase of the newspaper in August 2007. … Continued


ARTICLE: Habit keeps older people true to traditional news

When it comes to older persons, traditional news media is still the first chosen source of information. The study by Karin Ljuslinder and Anna Sofia Lundgren, both of Umeå Universitet, analyses the narratives of older people about their news media consumption and their reasons for getting news about the surrounding world from the traditional news press. The article … Continued


Untitled by Thomas Ulrich, licence CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: In Chile, TV is better for democracy than newspapers

Chilean television news provide more civic and watchdog journalism than newspapers do, write Daniel C. Hallin, of University of California San Diego, and Claudia Mellado, of Pontifical Catholic University of Valparaíso. The authors analysed the news output of two Chilean newspapers and two television channels. The authors sought signs of three types of “journalistic role … Continued


ARTICLE: Framing of nationally and locally sensitive issues in China

Sensitivity of news is expected to influence news framing significantly, write Xianwen Kuang and Rining Wei, both of Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University. The authors choose two sensitive political issues with different geographic relevance and explore the frame use of three party and three nonparty newspapers in China. The study confirms the assumption that the framing of nationally sensitive … Continued


"Rt Hon Jeremy Corbyn, Leader of the Labour Party, UK", courtesy of Chatham House, licence CC BY 2.0;

ARTICLE: British press “viciously” attacked Jeremy Corbyn

The British press was highly antagonistic against Jeremy Corbyn when he was running for and got elected as the leader of the Labour Party. London School of Economics researchers Bart Cammaerts, Brooks DeCillia and João Carlos Magalhães investigated the coverage of eight national newspapers during the two months before, and two months after Corbyn’s election. … Continued


Untitled by StockSnap, licence CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Newspapers’ front pages have less news than before

American newspapers’ front pages have become more magazine-like since 1988, Miki Tanikawa, of Akita International University, writes. Tanikawa analysed a sample of three newspapers’ front pages from between 1988 and 2013. The sample covered The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, and the International Herald Tribune. Over time, the number of “straight news” declined on … Continued




Picture: Colors by Mathias Appel, license CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Length of articles and size of newspapers affect diversity of content

Diversity of news content can be regarded as an indicator of the quality of reporting. In a new article, a group of researchers figured out what factors determine diversity of news. The paper studied newspaper articles concerning immigration in Belgium, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom between January 2013 and April 2014. Researchers measured diversity … Continued