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Training innovators for a conservative sector

New study by Marcel Broersma of the University of Groningen and Jane Singer of City University of London describes how young journalists perceive their role and journalistic innovation and entrepreunial journalism in the quite conservative news business. Among journalists, there is a strong commitment to being a change agent, and utilizing innovation and new technology. … Continued


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Chavismo and self-censorship

In their new study, Paromita Pain and Ezequiel Korin, of the University of Nevada, studied how self-censorship has become the internalized norm for journalists starting from 1998 under the rule of Hugo Chavez, and his ideology Chavismo. The literature review shows how self-censorship exists as a continuum, ranging from explicit restrictions in authoritarian regimes to … Continued


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Obsessive-activist reporting as a new model of journalism

In a new study, Avshalom Ginosar of Academic College Yezreel Valley, and Zvi Reich of the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, describe existing archetypes of journalists and present a new candidate: the “obsessive-activist journalist”. Following a review of literature on journalism models and role perceptions, the researchers findings are based on interviews of 17 Israeli … Continued


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Finnish journalists experience interference in many forms

A new study by Ilmari Hiltunen of Tampere University and Aleksi Suuronen of Åbo Akademi University offers new empirical evidence on external interference in contemporary journalism, using Finland as a case example. The study employed two methods: statistical analysis and a survey of 875 Finnish journalists. Age and gender were only marginal factors in the … Continued


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Diversity examined in 18 British, Swedish, and German newsrooms

A new study in Journalism Practice by Julia Lück, Tanjev Schultz, Sabine Kieslich, of the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, and Felix Simon and Alexandra Borchardt of the University of Oxford, explores the issue of internal diversity in newsrooms as a reflection of the society. The authors conducted semi-standardized interviews of editors-in-chief and managing editors … Continued



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ARTICLE: When it comes to professional principles, online and offline journalists in Europe are much alike

Are online journalists different from print and broadcast colleagues when it comes to professional standards? Imke Henkel of the University of Lincoln, Neil Thurman of LMU Münich, and Judith Möller and Damian Trilling of the University of Amsterdam put this thought to test by comparing professional principles and practices among online, offline, and multiplatform journalists. … Continued


Poor working conditions drive journalists into public relations

What drives journalists to become “turncoats” and how do they reflect upon their career change? Bernadette Kester, of Erasmus University Rotterdam, and Mirjam Prenger, of University of Amsterdam, interviewed 11 former journalists, who had abandoned journalism in favour of a career in PR. The interviewees cited two major reasons for “changing sides”. First, they felt … Continued



ARTICLE: Accusations of lying prompt self-reflection in German media

German news media has been recently met with an renewed flurry of Lügenpresse accusations. The term Lügenpresse, or “lying press”, dates back to the First World War, but is best known for its use by the German Nazi party. In recent years, the term’s use has resurged. Michael Koliska, of Georgetown University, and Karin Assmann, … Continued