Picture: untitled by Clem Onojeguo, license Unsplash

ARTICLE: When it comes to professional principles, online and offline journalists in Europe are much alike

Are online journalists different from print and broadcast colleagues when it comes to professional standards? Imke Henkel of the University of Lincoln, Neil Thurman of LMU Münich, and Judith Möller and Damian Trilling of the University of Amsterdam put this thought to test by comparing professional principles and practices among online, offline, and multiplatform journalists. … Continued


Poor working conditions drive journalists into public relations

What drives journalists to become “turncoats” and how do they reflect upon their career change? Bernadette Kester, of Erasmus University Rotterdam, and Mirjam Prenger, of University of Amsterdam, interviewed 11 former journalists, who had abandoned journalism in favour of a career in PR. The interviewees cited two major reasons for “changing sides”. First, they felt … Continued



ARTICLE: Accusations of lying prompt self-reflection in German media

German news media has been recently met with an renewed flurry of Lügenpresse accusations. The term Lügenpresse, or “lying press”, dates back to the First World War, but is best known for its use by the German Nazi party. In recent years, the term’s use has resurged. Michael Koliska, of Georgetown University, and Karin Assmann, … Continued


ARTICLE: BBC’s senior journalists are disconnected from the public

Prominent journalists working for the British Broadcasting Corporation are very different from their audience, Gary James Merrill, of University of Roehampton, writes. He investigated the social constitution of 66 senior BBC journalists and compared them to national data. Merrill also included samples of senior Conservative and Labour politicians in the comparison. The journalists have more … Continued


ARTICLE: Autocracies are not the most dangerous places for journalists

Most journalists are killed in so-called “hybrid regimes”, Sallie Hughes, of University of Miami, and Yulia Vorobyeva, of Florida International University, found. They came to the conclusion after analyzing all journalists’ deaths on record from the past quarter century. The Committee to Protect Journalists’ database includes 1 812 journalists’ deaths from 1992-2016. Most of these … Continued


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Special issue of Journalism Practice: 28 articles for working journalists

The journal Journalism Practice has published a special issue directed at working journalists, edited by Bonnie Brennen and Robert E. Gutsche Jr. The open access theme issue showcases research that has been distilled and revised for a more general audience outside academia. It includes 28 texts related to studies published earlier in the journals Journalism … Continued


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ARTICLE: Working in news media often spills over to family life, and vice versa

Work-life balance is a difficult one to handle in a newsroom job. A new study seeked to find out perceptions, strategies and advice from newsrooms workers. “Every respondent reported some degree of difficulty while attempting to balance the nontraditional schedules and long hours inherent in the news industry along with caring for families and self-wellbeing”, … Continued


Picture: capturing a few textural images through the window at a stop sign by Tim Foster, license CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: What do journalism textbooks teach about reporting suicide?

Journalists’ use of news values on specific topics change as societal and scientific norms change. A new research article shows how this transformation can be seen in the case of suicide coverage. Perry Parks of Michigan State University analysed journalism textbooks published in the United States between 1894 to 2016. Suicide has long been a … Continued