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ARTICLE: Using “The Newsroom” to teach journalism ethics

Can a television show teach students ethics of journalism? Laveda J. Peterlin of the University of Saint Mary Leavenworth and Jonathan Peters of the University of Georgia, examined the “The Newsroom” as a way to introduce ethical concepts in teaching. The authors analysed 10 episodes of the series and detected parts where basic principles of … Continued


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ARTICLE: Social media guidelines affect journalistic boundary-setting

Social media policies reveal some underlying assumptions about the role of new media within the traditional boundaries of the newsroom, a new study states. Andrew Duffy of Nanyang Technological University and Megan Knight of the University of Hertfordshire, examined social media policies in 17 news organisations in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and … Continued


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ARTICLE: Interpretive journalism on government negotiations has risen significantly in Belgium

The amount of interpretive political journalism has risen steadily in Belgium over the years, a study finds. Karolin Soontjens of the University of Antwerp, studied newspaper coverage on coalition negotiations in Belgium, conducting a content analysis for news articles between 1985 and 2014. The author analysed a total of 1 342 articles from two Flemish newspapers, … Continued


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ARTICLE: News users as ‘approximately informed’ and ‘occasionally monitorial’

We need to reconceptualize our expectations of citizens’ news use, state Brita Ytre-Arne and Hallvard Moe, of the University of Bergen, in a new article. The researchers identify gaps between normative ideals and realistic accounts of news use in democracy today. They develop the unrealistic ideal of the ‘informed citizen’ towards more realism, drawing on … Continued



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ARTICLE: Western approaches to ethics training have failed in Cambodia

Fergal Quinn, of the University of Limerick, studied the teaching of journalism ethics in a developing country. The author interviewed 25 organizers of journalism training programs in Cambodia and 29 working journalists who have previously studied in these programs. The press culture in Cambodia is vulnerable, with strong bias toward particular political parties. In the … Continued


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ARTICLE: Paradigm repair and building the journalistic paradigm

Earlier research has higlighted instances of ‘paradigm repair’, moments when journalists deploy discursive strategies to defend the paradigmatic status quo from a perceived internal threat. These threats have included different acts, such as journalists engaging in plagiarism. A new essay by Tim P. Vos and Joseph Moore, of the University of Missouri, seeks to historicize … Continued


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ARTICLE: Chinese media frame Islam and Muslims negatively

Chinese state news reports project an overall negative view of Muslims, a new study shows. Luwei Rose Luqiu of Pennsylvania State University, and Fan Yang of the University at Albany, conducted a three-part research about Islamophobia. The researchers did a content analysis of Chinese state news media reports from 2005-2015 about Muslims and Islam (n=15 427), … Continued



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ARTICLE: News organizations should consider legal liability as they develop automated journalism

Could algorithms produce libelous news content? Seth C. Lewis of the University of Oregon, Amy Kristin Sanders of Northwestern University in Qatar, and Casey Carmody of the University of Minnesota, state that news organizations must seriously consider legal liability as they develop newswriting bots. They review the issue in the context of the United States’s … Continued