Picture: #metoo by Mihai Surdu, license Unsplash

Networks in newsrooms enable unethical behavior to persist

New study by Minette E. Drumwright of the University of Texas at Austin and Peggy H. Cunningham of Dalhousie University, uses behavioral ethics to study sexual harassment in newsrooms and unethical journalistic content produced by newsrooms. Interviews of 25 participants in Canada and United States was conducted. Journalists had varying levels of experience and positions … Continued


Picture: A mute LED on a modern, digital audio mixer, by Mika Baumeister, license Unsplash

Chavismo and self-censorship

In their new study, Paromita Pain and Ezequiel Korin, of the University of Nevada, studied how self-censorship has become the internalized norm for journalists starting from 1998 under the rule of Hugo Chavez, and his ideology Chavismo. The literature review shows how self-censorship exists as a continuum, ranging from explicit restrictions in authoritarian regimes to … Continued


Picture: Walter Lippmann, by Harris & Ewing, photographer, from the Library of Congress Collection, Wikimedia Commons

Objectivity, detachment, and Walter Lippmann

The iconic Walter Lippmann was a forceful advocate for journalistic objectivity. He had a strong belief in “detachment” as an ideal for a journalist. Julien Gorbach of the University of Hawaii at Manoa, writes about the journalist in his new study. The article explores balancing between two journalistic ideals: standing up for something, and being … Continued



Picture: untitled by Ant Rozetsky, license Unsplash

Diversity examined in 18 British, Swedish, and German newsrooms

A new study in Journalism Practice by Julia Lück, Tanjev Schultz, Sabine Kieslich, of the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, and Felix Simon and Alexandra Borchardt of the University of Oxford, explores the issue of internal diversity in newsrooms as a reflection of the society. The authors conducted semi-standardized interviews of editors-in-chief and managing editors … Continued




ARTICLE: The Lampedusa disaster had no lasting effect on immigration coverage

“Was Lampedusa a key event for immigration news?” An international team of researchers posed this question to a sample of 2 059 news articles on immigration. The sample covers three countries, 17 newspapers, and 16 months around the 2013 shipwreck which claimed the lives of 359 Italy-bound immigrants. A key event is a news event … Continued


ARTICLE: Journalists still prefer traditional audience metrics

American journalists still find page views and social sharing to be the most useful audience metrics. Valerie Belair-Gagnon, Rodrigo Zamith and Avery E. Holton surveyed 520 American newspaper, magazine and online journalists. The authors represent the universities of Minnesota, Massachusetts Amherst, and Utah, respectively. Aside from the journalists’ metric preference, the authors wanted to investigate … Continued


ARTICLE: Egypt’s media missed its opportunity to reform

Egyptian media enjoyed a brief period of relative freedom after the 2011 revolution that ousted then-president Hosni Mubarak. However, journalists failed to reform their professional identities and the media system, which lead to the media’s descent into highly polarized political parallelism – and eventual regression back into the new regime’s servitude. Fatima el Issawi, of … Continued