ARTICLE: Journalists’ moral reasoning is becoming weaker

Modern journalists seem to have less moral reasoning skills than their predecessors, write Patrick Ferrucci and Erin E. Schauster, both of University of Colorado, with Edson C. Tandoc Jr., of Nanyang Technological University (author names not in original order). They conducted a Defining Issues Test (DIT) on 170 American journalists and compared their results to … Continued


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ARTICLE: What do journalism textbooks teach about reporting suicide?

Journalists’ use of news values on specific topics change as societal and scientific norms change. A new research article shows how this transformation can be seen in the case of suicide coverage. Perry Parks of Michigan State University analysed journalism textbooks published in the United States between 1894 to 2016. Suicide has long been a … Continued


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ARTICLE: The important role of editors for journalism

Editors practice quality control and negotiate among various groups in news journalism. Research papers have rarely taken this role as their focus. “Clearer assessment of the editor thus allows for richer assessment of what is – and what is not – journalism”, Andrew Duffy of Nanyang Technological University, writes in a new study. The role … Continued


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ARTICLE: Using “The Newsroom” to teach journalism ethics

Can a television show teach students ethics of journalism? Laveda J. Peterlin of the University of Saint Mary Leavenworth and Jonathan Peters of the University of Georgia, examined the “The Newsroom” as a way to introduce ethical concepts in teaching. The authors analysed 10 episodes of the series and detected parts where basic principles of … Continued


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ARTICLE: Social media guidelines affect journalistic boundary-setting

Social media policies reveal some underlying assumptions about the role of new media within the traditional boundaries of the newsroom, a new study states. Andrew Duffy of Nanyang Technological University and Megan Knight of the University of Hertfordshire, examined social media policies in 17 news organisations in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and … Continued


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ARTICLE: Interpretive journalism on government negotiations has risen significantly in Belgium

The amount of interpretive political journalism has risen steadily in Belgium over the years, a study finds. Karolin Soontjens of the University of Antwerp, studied newspaper coverage on coalition negotiations in Belgium, conducting a content analysis for news articles between 1985 and 2014. The author analysed a total of 1 342 articles from two Flemish newspapers, … Continued


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ARTICLE: News users as ‘approximately informed’ and ‘occasionally monitorial’

We need to reconceptualize our expectations of citizens’ news use, state Brita Ytre-Arne and Hallvard Moe, of the University of Bergen, in a new article. The researchers identify gaps between normative ideals and realistic accounts of news use in democracy today. They develop the unrealistic ideal of the ‘informed citizen’ towards more realism, drawing on … Continued



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ARTICLE: Western approaches to ethics training have failed in Cambodia

Fergal Quinn, of the University of Limerick, studied the teaching of journalism ethics in a developing country. The author interviewed 25 organizers of journalism training programs in Cambodia and 29 working journalists who have previously studied in these programs. The press culture in Cambodia is vulnerable, with strong bias toward particular political parties. In the … Continued


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ARTICLE: Paradigm repair and building the journalistic paradigm

Earlier research has higlighted instances of ‘paradigm repair’, moments when journalists deploy discursive strategies to defend the paradigmatic status quo from a perceived internal threat. These threats have included different acts, such as journalists engaging in plagiarism. A new essay by Tim P. Vos and Joseph Moore, of the University of Missouri, seeks to historicize … Continued