Newsroom of the New York Times newspaper by Marjory Collins, licence CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Political journalists differ from others, but not much

Do political journalists stand apart in how they perceive their job and its requirements? Jari Väliverronen, of University of Tampere, studied Finnish political journalists by analysing survey data gathered originally for the Worlds of Journalism study. Väliverronen’s data consisted of two survey samples: the first covered journalists in general (N=345) and the second targeted political … Continued


Picture: Equalizer by kalhh, license CC0 1.0 & untitled by FirmBee, license CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: A look at the intense working conditions of digital journalists

What is it like to work in a digital newsroom nowadays? Nicole S. Cohen of the University of Toronto Mississauga, interviewed 12 digital journalists in Canada and United States during 2015 about their daily work and working conditions. Job descriptions for digital journalists are varying, as was also evident in this study. For many, their … Continued



ARTICLE: The professional identity of journalists who work across media cultures

Growing media practitioner mobility, as well as the migration of transnational media corporations across borders and media cultures, gives rise to new questions about how journalistic professionalism travels, write Mei Li and Naren Chitty, both of Macquarie University. The authors study the case of CCTV-NEWS, a Chinese state-owned transnational media corporation that recruits Western journalists. The … Continued


Picture: Blooming Clarity by Connie Krejci, licence CC BY 2.0

ARTICLE: The hybridity in journalistic cultures

Most comparative research on media systems and journalistic cultures has focused on advanced democracies only. In a new study, researchers analyzed journalistic role performance doing a content analysis for a total of 34 514 print news articles. The study included 19 countries located in Western and Eastern Europe, North America, Latin America, and Asia. Researchers analyzed … Continued


Picture: Peeling Wall Paint by Steve Snodgrass, license CC BY 2.0

ARTICLE: Communities in Israel making sense of extremist violence

How do cultural-level sense-making processes work in a highly conflictual case? Christian Baden and Yossi David, both of The Hebrew University Jerusalem, studied media coverage on Israeli president Reuven Rivlin’s interpretation of two lethal attacks by Jewish extremists on a Palestinian family and the Jerusalem Gay Pride Parade in 2015. The authors compared coverage by … Continued


Picture: untitled by albersHeinemann, license CC0 1.0, edited

ARTICLE: Practices of mobile journalism at Hindustan Times

Mobile journalism practices have provided new skills to and have also been time-consuming for journalists, Indian reporters state in a new study. Anoop Kumar and M. Shuaib Mohamed Haneef, both of Pondicherry University, India, gathered qualitative data by observing and interviewing journalists and editors at Hindustan Times, the second biggest English daily newspaper in India. … Continued


Untitled by StockSnap, licence CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: News photographers are depicted as “sidekicks”

News discourse depicts photojournalists as mere “support staff” for reporters, write Mary Angela Bock, Kyser Lough and Deepa Fadnis, all of University of Texas at Austin. The authors used discourse analysis to pick through the coverage of the dramatic, on-air murder of two journalists working on different sides of the camera. Two American journalists working … Continued


ARTICLE: Journalists’ self-branding on Twitter

Based on a quantitative content analysis, Ulrika Hedman, of University of Gothenburg, examines Swedish journalists’ Twitter account presentations. The focus of the analysis is on how the technological affordances of Twitter shape journalists’ self-branding and whether there are differences between groups of journalists. It seems that Swedish journalists use professional attributes, such as title and workplace, in … Continued


Picture: untitled by Christina Gottardi, license CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Institutional constraints cause varying forms of censorship towards critical journalism

Andrew Kennis of Universidad Iberoamericana, México, studied “whether institutional constraints are more powerful than standardized journalistic norms and practices in determining news content”, also looking at news media independence from poweful corporate and state interests in the United States. The author examines the theoretical tension between two models of media analysis – the indexing and … Continued