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ARTICLE: Journalists’ self-branding on Twitter

Based on a quantitative content analysis, Ulrika Hedman, of University of Gothenburg, examines Swedish journalists’ Twitter account presentations. The focus of the analysis is on how the technological affordances of Twitter shape journalists’ self-branding and whether there are differences between groups of journalists. It seems that Swedish journalists use professional attributes, such as title and workplace, in … Continued


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ARTICLE: Institutional constraints cause varying forms of censorship towards critical journalism

Andrew Kennis of Universidad Iberoamericana, México, studied “whether institutional constraints are more powerful than standardized journalistic norms and practices in determining news content”, also looking at news media independence from poweful corporate and state interests in the United States. The author examines the theoretical tension between two models of media analysis – the indexing and … Continued


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ARTICLE: Most Kenyan journalists enjoy a fair amount of journalistic autonomy

Most Kenyan journalists feel they have freedom to decide what to include in news. Kioko Ireri, of United States International University Africa, conducted a survey in 2012-2013 with 504 Kenyan journalists working in various media, asking about news selection decisions, media freedom and autonomy. 59% of respondents believe there is enough media freedom in Kenya. … Continued



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ARTICLE: The relationships between PR and journalists in Germany

Relationships between journalists and PR practitioners are complex. Thomas Koch, of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Magdalena Obermaier and Claudia Riesmeyer, both of Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, conducted a survey to which 835 journalists and 601 public relations practitioners in Germany responded, looking at how public relations exerts power over journalists. The research studies six bases of … Continued


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ARTICLE: Lifestyle journalists are not all the same

The role conceptions of lifestyle journalists vary according to their specialization, Folker Hanusch, of University of Vienna, writes. The author surveyed 616 Australian lifestyle journalists over how important they saw certain aspects of their work. Hanusch’s study recognizes four professional role conceptions: the “Service Provider”, “Life Coach”, “Community Advocate” and the “Inspiring Entertainer”. Out of … Continued


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ARTICLE: A multi-level look at environmental journalism

How do different levels of influences affect the daily work of environmental journalists? Ever Josue Figueroa, of the University of Texas at Austin, studied environmental journalism as a space for a multi-level analysis, using a newer configuration of the hierarchy of influences model (HOI) as a theoretical framework. Figueroa conducted in-depth interviews with 13 environmental … Continued


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ARTICLE: Performance of journalistic roles affects objectivity of reporting

Comparative research on journalistic objectivity has most often been studied in Western contexts. Claudia Mellado, of Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaiso, María Luisa Humanes, of Rey Juan Carlos University, and Mireya Márquez-Ramírez, of Universidad Iberoamericana, studied the relation between role performance and the implementation of the objectivity norm in Chile, Mexico, and Spain. The authors … Continued


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ARTICLE: Journalistic autonomy requires balancing between professional, organizational and relational dimensions

High concentration of media ownership and the proximity of the media to political and economic elites have been identified as challenges to the autonomy of Chilean journalism. Ximena Orchard, of the Universidad Alberto Hurtado, examined how journalists negotiate notions of autonomy in their daily exchanges with politicians. The study is based on semi-structured interviews from … Continued


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ARTICLE: Reconstructing Rwanda through journalism

Since the 1994 Rwandan genocide, the country’s media landscape has changed dramatically. Karen McIntyre, of Virginia Commonwealth University and Meghan Sobel, of Regis University used qualitative interviews to figure out how Rwandan journalists view their roles today and whether they have contributed to the reconstruction and recovery of the country by practicing constructive journalism. Constructive … Continued