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Ghanaian female journalists’ work-life balance

New article “Multiskilled in Many Ways: Ghanaian Female Journalists Between Job and Home” by Kodwo Jonas Anson Boateng of University of Jyväskylä and Epp Lauk Vytautas Magnus University Kaunas investigates the challenges Ghanaian female journalists face when combining their work and family life, with gendered expectations for caregiver role. Unstructured in-depth interviews of 23 female … Continued


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Training innovators for a conservative sector

New study by Marcel Broersma of the University of Groningen and Jane Singer of City University of London describes how young journalists perceive their role and journalistic innovation and entrepreunial journalism in the quite conservative news business. Among journalists, there is a strong commitment to being a change agent, and utilizing innovation and new technology. … Continued


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Chavismo and self-censorship

In their new study, Paromita Pain and Ezequiel Korin, of the University of Nevada, studied how self-censorship has become the internalized norm for journalists starting from 1998 under the rule of Hugo Chavez, and his ideology Chavismo. The literature review shows how self-censorship exists as a continuum, ranging from explicit restrictions in authoritarian regimes to … Continued


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Technologization, LGBT self-media, and the the Chinese news ecology

Increasingly, social actors from outside the journalism business, including bloggers, commentators, coders, and Web analytics managers participate in the making of news and reshape journalism. This process also includes non-human actors such as algorithms and automated systems. The new article by Yidong Wang of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Valerie Belair-Gagnon of University of Minnesota, Twin … Continued


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Obsessive-activist reporting as a new model of journalism

In a new study, Avshalom Ginosar of Academic College Yezreel Valley, and Zvi Reich of the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, describe existing archetypes of journalists and present a new candidate: the “obsessive-activist journalist”. Following a review of literature on journalism models and role perceptions, the researchers findings are based on interviews of 17 Israeli … Continued


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ARTICLE: When it comes to professional principles, online and offline journalists in Europe are much alike

Are online journalists different from print and broadcast colleagues when it comes to professional standards? Imke Henkel of the University of Lincoln, Neil Thurman of LMU Münich, and Judith Möller and Damian Trilling of the University of Amsterdam put this thought to test by comparing professional principles and practices among online, offline, and multiplatform journalists. … Continued


ARTICLE: Egypt’s media missed its opportunity to reform

Egyptian media enjoyed a brief period of relative freedom after the 2011 revolution that ousted then-president Hosni Mubarak. However, journalists failed to reform their professional identities and the media system, which lead to the media’s descent into highly polarized political parallelism – and eventual regression back into the new regime’s servitude. Fatima el Issawi, of … Continued


ARTICLE: BBC’s senior journalists are disconnected from the public

Prominent journalists working for the British Broadcasting Corporation are very different from their audience, Gary James Merrill, of University of Roehampton, writes. He investigated the social constitution of 66 senior BBC journalists and compared them to national data. Merrill also included samples of senior Conservative and Labour politicians in the comparison. The journalists have more … Continued


ARTICLE: Journalists’ moral reasoning is becoming weaker

Modern journalists seem to have less moral reasoning skills than their predecessors, write Patrick Ferrucci and Erin E. Schauster, both of University of Colorado, with Edson C. Tandoc Jr., of Nanyang Technological University (author names not in original order). They conducted a Defining Issues Test (DIT) on 170 American journalists and compared their results to … Continued


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ARTICLE: The important role of editors for journalism

Editors practice quality control and negotiate among various groups in news journalism. Research papers have rarely taken this role as their focus. “Clearer assessment of the editor thus allows for richer assessment of what is – and what is not – journalism”, Andrew Duffy of Nanyang Technological University, writes in a new study. The role … Continued