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ARTICLE: Are personal stories better than news at disseminating health information?

Yi Mou, of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and Fuyuan Shen, of Pennsylvania State University, studied whether the effects of health information change according to its supposed source. They had 190 Chinese university students view social media posts made by a fictional person and surveyed them afterwards. The collection of social media posts contained either links … Continued


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ARTICLE: Journalists report suicide with caution, but also deviate from guidelines

Writing on the topic of suicide can have serious consequences for the reading public. Michael Mead Yaqub, Randal A Beam and Sue Lockett John, all of the University of Washington, interviewed 50 journalists in the United States about their awareness of and attitudes towards suicide, especially on risks related to reporting and US media recommendations. … Continued


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ARTICLE: Health journalism not prioritized in Native American news media

Health news is needed and valued by the Native American communities in the US, but coverage about the topic is insufficient. Sherice Gearhart and Oluseyi Adegbola, of Texas Tech University, and Teresa Trumbly-Lamsam, of the University of Nebraska at Omaha (authors not in original order), studied reporting about health in media outlets serving Native American … Continued


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ARTICLE: Who do journalists blame for cancer?

Yong-Chan Kim and Jee Hyun Kim (Yonsei University), Minsun Shim (Inha University), and Keeho Park (National Cancer Center) investigated where the “locus of responsibility” rests in news stories on cancer (author names not in original order). They analysed 1 500 stories from 24 South Korean news outlets, published between 2008 and 2012. Majority of the … Continued


ARTICLE: South Korean media is highly negative toward e-cigarettes

Sei-Hill Kim, James F. Thrasher, Yoo Jin Cho and Joon Kyoung Kim, of University of South Carolina, and Myung-Hyun Kang, of Hallym University (not in original order), analysed newspaper articles and television news transcripts, to study the quantity and the nature of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) coverage in South Korea. The study also examines the sources, topics, tones etc. of … Continued


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ARTICLE: News on HIV prevention medication downplay the virus’s severity

The way online news frame HIV prevention medication may lead to confusion among those at risk of contracting the virus, Joseph Schwartz, of Northeastern University, and Josh Grimm, of Louisiana State University, write. The authors analysed 234 online news stories about preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) on United State’s largest news websites, published between 2009 and 2016. … Continued


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ARTICLE: TV health news use most sources

Health news on television are more “richly sourced” than similar news on radio, in print, or online, Joyce Stroobant, Rebeca De Dobbelaer, and Karin Raeymaeckers (all of Ghent University) write. The authors analysed the health-related news pieces 35 Belgian news outlets published in February 2015 (N=981). The average number of sources used in TV health … Continued



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ARTICLE: Visual aids help viewers recall numbers from TV news

Presenting numerical data in tables or graphs will help TV news audience recall the information, a study on American college students shows. Ivanka Pjesivac, of University of Georgia, with Nicholas Geidner and Laura E. Miller, both of University of Tennessee, had 113 students participate in an online experiment. The participants viewed one of three versions … Continued


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ARTICLE: Journalists change roles in health crises

Journalists’ conceptions of their role change during health crises, such as epidemic outbreaks, write Celine Klemm and Tilo Hartmann, both of Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, with Enny Das, of Radboud University Nijmegen (author names not in original order). The authors interviewed 22 Finnish and German newspaper journalists with experience on health reporting. Journalists hold dear certain … Continued