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News sharing on apps is more about social ties than spreading the news

New research by Antonis Kalegoropoulos of the University of Liverpool compared news sharing habits of mobile messaging application users in four countries: US, UK, Germany, and Brazil. Employing comparative and mixed methods, the study had three questions to answer: to understand the profile of the users who shared news, the types of news they shared, … Continued


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Diversity examined in 18 British, Swedish, and German newsrooms

A new study in Journalism Practice by Julia Lück, Tanjev Schultz, Sabine Kieslich, of the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, and Felix Simon and Alexandra Borchardt of the University of Oxford, explores the issue of internal diversity in newsrooms as a reflection of the society. The authors conducted semi-standardized interviews of editors-in-chief and managing editors … Continued


ARTICLE: Migration news underrepresent women

Migrant women are much less visible than migrant men in German news on migration. Fabienne Lind, of University of Vienna, and Christine E. Meltzer, of University of Mainz, discovered the discrepancy through an automated content analysis of nearly 350 000 German news articles. The authors searched for migration related, German news articles from the LexisNexis … Continued


ARTICLE: Accusations of lying prompt self-reflection in German media

German news media has been recently met with an renewed flurry of Lügenpresse accusations. The term Lügenpresse, or “lying press”, dates back to the First World War, but is best known for its use by the German Nazi party. In recent years, the term’s use has resurged. Michael Koliska, of Georgetown University, and Karin Assmann, … Continued


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ARTICLE: Media coverage of Islam may affect radicalization

The way news cover Islam and Muslims has the potential to increase or decrease the likelihood of Islamist radicalization, an experiment conducted at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich suggests. Katharina Neumann, Florian Arendt and Philip Baugut first interviewed six former extremists (e.g. ISIS members), and then conducted a laboratory experiment with 194 self-identified Muslims … Continued


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ARTICLE: User generated content makes news appear less trustworthy

“It appears that journalism’s trustworthiness will more likely suffer than benefit from an increased use of UGC”, write Katherine M. Grosser and Florian Wintterlin, both of University of Münster, with Valerie Hase, of University of Zurich (names not in original order). The authors conducted an online experiment with 487 Germans, exposing the participants to articles … Continued


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ARTICLE: The relationships between PR and journalists in Germany

Relationships between journalists and PR practitioners are complex. Thomas Koch, of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Magdalena Obermaier and Claudia Riesmeyer, both of Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, conducted a survey to which 835 journalists and 601 public relations practitioners in Germany responded, looking at how public relations exerts power over journalists. The research studies six bases of … Continued


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ARTICLE: German newsrooms do not embrace transparency

The norm of transparency finds only “limited purchase” among German journalists, write Michael Koliska, of Georgetown University, and Kalyani Chadha, of University of Maryland. The authors interviewed 17 German journalists from 15 leading news outlets. Koliska and Chadha approached the adoption of the transparency norm through the concept of innovation diffusion. Relying on Everett Rogers‘ … Continued


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ARTICLE: Incomprehensible news create “illusions of knowledge”

People with low need for cognition (NFC) will feel more knowledgeable after reading an incomprehensible news article than after reading a comprehensible article, Mathias Weber and Christina Koehler, both of Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, discovered. The authors conducted an online experiment with 82 Germans. The participants read one of two versions of the same … Continued


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ARTICLE: Public service news are more diverse than commercial

News published online by public service broadcasters provide more diversity than news published by other types of news organisations, Edda Humprecht and Frank Esser, both of University of Zurich, write. The authors analysed 1 660 political news articles, published by 48 news organisations in six countries: United States, United Kingdom, France, Italy, Germany, and Switzerland. … Continued