Picture: SH-60B helicopter flies over Sendai by United States Navy, public domain

ARTICLE: Western newspapers used a cultural framework when reporting the Great East Japan Disaster

The Great East Japan Disaster of 2011 provides an important case study through which to evaluate how the western media cover Japan. Besides the nuclear crisis, limited attention has been paid to news reporting across the multiple overlapping disaster. Jamie Matthews of Bournemouth University did a critical discourse analysis of coverage of the disaster in … Continued


Picture: Euromaidan 19 February 9 by ВО Свобода, license CC BY 3.0

ARTICLE: The coverage of the Ukraine conflict in 13 European countries

The crisis in Ukraine in 2014 was covered in varying ways around Europe. A group of researchers did a content analysis for coverage on the conflict from the first half of 2014. All in all, they examined two newspapers (24 issues from each paper) from 13 countries: Albania, Czech Republic, Germany, Latvia, the Netherlands, Poland, … Continued


Picture: Globe map by Duangphorn Wiriya, license CC0 1.0

PAPER: The relation between foreign news coverage and web search activity

If a country gets major media attention from other countries, does it also come up in people’s searches? Haewoon Kwak, Jisun An, Joni Salminen, Soon-Gyo Jung and Bernard J. Jansen, all of Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar, studied media attention and public interest towards different topics. Researchers collected one hundred most popular topics daily for … Continued


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ARTICLE: Big news agencies do not necessarily dominate international news coverage

Three transnational news agencies have dominated the wholesales of news. As media ecosystems are changing, so is the role of the agencies. Ali Rafeeq and Shujun Jiang of the United Arab Emirates University, examine the influence of Associated Press (AP), Reuters, and Agence France-Presse (AFP), titled the ‘Big Three’, on three online newspapers. The news … Continued


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ARTICLE: US television coverage of Nigeria is mostly negative

Western media coverage of Africa has long been a subject of controversy. US television news portray Nigeria mainly in a negative light, a new study by Oluseyi Adegbola and Sherice Gearhart of Texas Tech University, and Jacqueline Skarda-Mitchell of the University of Nebraska Omaha (authors not in original order), finds. Authors analyzed television coverage of … Continued


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ARTICLE: National policies affect terrorism coverage

National policies affect the way major broadcasters cover politically motivated violence, write Ying Roselyn Du, of Hong Kong Baptist University, and Lulu Li, of Chinese University of Hong Kong. The authors analysed 142 news stories on terrorist attacks, published online by the Chinese CCTV and the American CNN. The authors searched for news on two … Continued



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PAPER: Collaboration software brings virtual newsrooms together

How does the use of online collaborative software affect newsroom culture? Mel Bunce, of City, University of London, Kate Wright, of the University of Edinburgh, and Martin Scott, of University of East Anglia, conducted an ethnographic case study at a news agency. The case study focused on the humanitarian, non-profit news agency IRIN. The agency’s … Continued


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ARTICLE: Traditional foreign correspondence is hard to replace

Using “virtual correspondence” can help ease the workload of traditional foreign correspondents – but not replace them, write Oliver Hahn, Florian Stalph and Tom Steller, all of University of Passau. They report on six years of experimenting with virtual correspondence with a total of 90 German journalism students. Based on the students’ experiences, virtual correspondents … Continued


Picture: Global visitors by Christine Roy, license CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: The bigger and more powerful a country is, the less foreign news it produces

Many factors influence the volume of foreign news reported in different countries. The new study by Miki Tanikawa of Akita International University, Japan, takes a macro-level look at the issue. Tanikawa studied countries’ size and strengths as determinants of foreign news volume. The researcher used secondary data from two recent international studies on television news … Continued