Untitled by Ahmad Ardity, licence CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Americans want more objectivity and less interpretation

Do journalists and their audience agree on what journalism should be like? The question was investigated by Lars Willnat, of Syracuse University, with David H. Weaver and G. Cleveland Wilhoit, both of Indiana University-Bloomington. The authors compared the results from two surveys with American journalists (N=1080) and members of the public (N=1230). The surveys inquired, … Continued


ARTICLE: Politicians’ hostile media perceptions

Politicians’ discomfort with journalism may be based on the hostile media phenomenon (HMP), write Jörg Matthes, of University of Vienna, Peter Maurer, of Norwegian University of Science and Technology, and Florian Arendt, of University of Munich. The HMP describes a process in which highly involved individuals perceive the news media as more hostile compared to individuals who … Continued


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ARTICLE: How to better analyse “echo chambers”

Curd Benjamin Knüpfer, of George Washington University, proposes a new model for analysing so-called “echo chambers”. To be more specific, Knüpfer moves away from the term “echo chamber”, suggesting it implies an unnecessarily insular concept. The new model, then, consists of potentially overlapping feedback loops. The author’s model is four-layered. First, information emerges within a … Continued


Reacting to accusations about migration reporting – Torbjörn von Krogh and Göran Svensson interview

VIDEO: Reacting to accusations about migration reporting

Torbjörn von Krogh and Göran Svensson, talked to us at NordMedia 2017 conference. They have been studying media trust, especially how media responds to accusations related to migration issues. The researchers also share their impressions from the conference and plans for the future. The interview was filmed at the NordMedia 2017 conference in Tampere. This … Continued


ARTICLE: Can immersive journalism enhance empathy?

In recent years, major news outlets have started to use the techniques and rhetoric of “immersive journalism”, writes Ana Luisa Sánchez Laws, of Volda University College, Norway. Immersive journalism builds on the premise that using virtual reality to locate viewers where events take place can enhance empathy. But can it? The roots of immersive journalism are in … Continued


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ARTICLE: “Robots” do not make credible journalists

Readers find news stories written by “robot journalists” less credible than stories by human authors, T. Franklin Waddell, of University of Florida, writes. Waddell conducted two online experiments with a total of 311 Americans, where the participants were exposed to identical stories with different bylines. Most notably, stories credited to “Automated Insights, Robot Reporter” were … Continued


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ARTICLE: Are personal stories better than news at disseminating health information?

Yi Mou, of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and Fuyuan Shen, of Pennsylvania State University, studied whether the effects of health information change according to its supposed source. They had 190 Chinese university students view social media posts made by a fictional person and surveyed them afterwards. The collection of social media posts contained either links … Continued


Picture: Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling Tower by Ruhrfisch, license CC BY-SA 4.0, cropped

ARTICLE: Environmental narratives work better when they resonate with people’s orientations

Fuyuan Shen and Lee Ahern of Pennsylvania State University, and Jiangxue Han of Appalachian State University, studied how individuals’ environmental orientations moderate how people perceive environmental news. The researchers did an experiment in which they made 88 students read either a narrative or informational newspaper article on the environmental consequences of shale gas drilling in … Continued


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ARTICLE: Who pays for investigative journalism online – and why?

John Price, of University of Sunderland, has surveyed the subscribers of the online investigative journalism co-operative, The Ferret. Price wanted to find out who the subscribers are and what makes them want to invest money on the service. A total of 110 subscribers responded to Price’s survey, which represents a quarter of the small Scottish … Continued


Mapping news consumption – Kim Schrøder interview

VIDEO: Mapping news consumption

Kim Schrøder, Professor of Communication at Roskilde University, talked to us about his research on how people use news media in their everyday life. Schrøder has studied this from two perspectives: with a quantitative “high-altitude” level and a qualitative ”ground-level” approach. His findings shed light on social media and the willingness to pay for news. … Continued