CFP JRN

CFP | 27.4. | Vigilante audiences

The Erasmus Research Centre of Media, Communication and Culture is calling for chapter proposals for an upcoming, edited book on “Vigilante Audiences”. The volume will be published online in an open access format. The publication project also includes a two-day workshop, to be held in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, in October 2018. The book will focus … Continued



ARTICLE: Automated news recommendation can be as good as human editors

Is automated news recommendation a threat to content diversity, leading to audience getting trapped inside “filter bubbles”? Judith Möller, Damian Trilling and Natali Helberger, all of University of Amsterdam, with Bram van Es, of eScience Center, investigated the question through a statistical simulation. The authors used a sample of almost 22 000 news articles published … Continued


REPORT: Twitter subcultures are wary of journalism

How do different subcultures interact with, and react to, mainstream journalism on Twitter? A team of American researchers investigated the matter through three American Twitter-spheres: “Black”, “Feminist” and “Asian-American Twitter”. The researchers analysed over 44 million Twitter messages which bore certain subculture-related hashtags, e.g. #blacklivesmatter, #girlslikeus and #freshofftheboat, respectively. In addition, 45 people were interviewed … Continued


Picture: Man reading newspaper by Kaboompics, Karolina, license CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: The effect of format and source type on how people select news

A growing competition for audiences and the proliferation of new sources, sometimes less credible, have changed how people read news. Are the concerns over news consumption specific to the medium on which people get their news? ask George D.H. Pearson and Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick of the Ohio State University. The researchers looked for differing patterns of … Continued


Picture: Coding Screen by Taras Shypka, license CC0 1.0 and text from the study, license CC BY-NC 4.0

ARTICLE: Human-written, automated and combined news articles were seen equally as credible

As many news organizations are already using computer algorithms to produce journalistic content, questions about how audiences view these stories arise. Anja Wölker and Thomas E. Powell of the University of Amsterdam, did an experiment on how readers perceive different forms of automated journalism in regard to credibility of the message and source. Their online … Continued


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ARTICLE: Americans are not that interested in fake news, after all

Few Americans are deeply invested in consuming so-called fake news, Jacob L. Nelson, of Northwestern University, and Harsh Taneja, of University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, write. The authors analysed the browsing data collected from one million Americans before and after the 2016 presidential elections. Nelson and Taneja compared online traffic to established news websites (e.g. New … Continued


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ARTICLE: Media coverage of Islam may affect radicalization

The way news cover Islam and Muslims has the potential to increase or decrease the likelihood of Islamist radicalization, an experiment conducted at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich suggests. Katharina Neumann, Florian Arendt and Philip Baugut first interviewed six former extremists (e.g. ISIS members), and then conducted a laboratory experiment with 194 self-identified Muslims … Continued


Picture: Al Jazeera Arabic Channel by Enda Nasution, license CC BY-NC 2.0

ARTICLE: Perceptions of audience shaping Al Jazeera’s news

What do journalists imagine their audiences are like, and how does this affect their work? Julian Matthews of the University of Leicester, and Maiya Al Habsi of Al-Bayan College, studied the topic in a non-national and more global context. They examined news professionals’ perceptions of the Arab news audience at Al Jazeera, and how it … Continued


Picture: chain link sculpture, Berlin by Tanya Hart, license CC BY-SA 2.0

ARTICLE: Legacy media still have the strongest online audience overlap in the US and UK

A new study by Subhayan Mukerjee and Sandra González-Bailón of the University of Pennsylvania, and Sílvia Majó-Vázquez of the University of Oxford (authors not in original order), created a novel way to find out how people consume news online. Researchers tracked the browsing behaviour of web users and looked at the networks they form while … Continued