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ARTICLE: News audiences are not fragmented in the Japanese Twittersphere

Existing studies on ideological selective exposure have several limitations, state Tetsuro Kobayashi of City University Hong Kong, Yuki Ogawa of Ritsumeikan University, Takahisa Suzuki of Tsuda University, and Hitoshi Yamamoto of Rissho University. The authors examined selective exposure and news audience fragmentation in the Japanese Twittersphere. Researchers tested the generalizability of US findings in the … Continued


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ARTICLE: How online harassment influences the work of female journalists

Female journalists face rampant online harassment, across different cultures, new study states. Researchers interviewed 75 female journalists who have worked in Germany, India, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Engaging with audiences online through comment sections or social media, is often a job requirement for journalists. The harassment disrupts the reciprocity between journalists … Continued


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ARTICLE: Analytics tools rationalize journalistic work while creating a compelling user experience

How do analytics rationalize journalistic work? Rutgers University researcher Caitlin Petre spent six months at the newsroom analytics company Chartbeat doing ethnographic observation and interviews. The author looked at discursive strategies and design elements used by the company to influence journalists’ views on the issue. The newsroom analytics dashboard differs from a “Taylorist” stopwatch in … Continued


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ARTICLE: The Guardian articles written by women and people of color received a disproportionate amount of abusive comments

Compared to men, articles written by women attracted a higher percentage of inappropriate comments, new study finds. Becky Gardiner of Goldsmiths, University of London, studied blocked comments on The Guardian website. In 2006, The Guardian opened most of its articles to reader comments. While the articles were commented frequently, at the same time many journalists … Continued


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ARTICLE: People navigate news on social media based on ‘generalised scepticism’

As news are read more often via social media, the selection of what news people see is based increasingly on algorithms, instead of editorial selection. Richard Fletcher and Rasmus Kleis Nielsen of Oxford University, studied how people navigate news on social media, focusing on how they perceive news selection. The authors did a two-part study. … Continued


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ARTICLE: Politically active people in Taiwan still read print newspapers

Tien-Tsung Lee of the University of Kansas, and Yuki Fujioka of Georgia State University analyzed data from the Taiwan Communication Survey (TCS) from 2013, looking at which news and information sources are connected to civic and political participation. Their sample included 2 000 Taiwanese adults. Print newspaper reading was positively associated with both online and offline … Continued



ARTICLE: The audience reacts more strongly to political scandals, if the information is presented bit by bit

Dividing a news story about a political scandal into several pieces will have a stronger effect than presenting all information at once, Christian von Sikorski and Johannes Knoll, both of University of Vienna, write. The authors came to the conclusion after conducting an experiment with 171 university students. The participants all read a (fictitious) story … Continued


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ARTICLE: Journalists are willing to engage with online commenters, but take action to limit the influence

The relationship between online commenters and journalists has been a tricky one. News organizations are struggling with how to allow for audience autonomy while still holding on to power and journalistic authority. J. David Wolfgang of Colorado State University researched how journalists attempt to frame commenting and its role alongside journalism. He did 1) a … Continued


ARTICLE: Who perceive the media to be biased?

What are the contributing factors that cause audience members to perceive the media to be biased? Jakob-Moritz Eberl, of University of Vienna, surveyed over 1 600 Austrians to investigate the question. First, Eberl’s analysis confirmed a number of background factors that contribute to perceived media bias, such as age, education, political interest, and political alignment. … Continued