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ARTICLE: Spain’s “Link Tax” increased fragmentation of online news consumption

The 2015 “Link Tax” legislation is Spain imposed a copyright fee for showing snippets of content created by newspapers. Similar regulations are being considered on the European level. Silvia Majó-Vásquez, of the University of Oxford, Ana S. Cardenal, of the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, and Sandra González-Bailón, of the University of Pennsylvania, examined the impact … Continued


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ARTICLE: The audience is not wholly convinced by virtual reality journalism

There is still notable ambivalence towards virtual reality’s utility in journalism, Sarah Jones, currently of Birmingham City University, writes (at the time of study Jones was working at Coventry University). Jones analysed twelve virtual reality features published in 2015, and conducted focus groups with 18 British university students. Jones identified two main categories of immersive … Continued



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ARTICLE: Consuming news from multiple platforms is good for civic engagement

Logan Molyneux, of Temple University, examined how civically engaged individuals consume various types of news content across multiple platforms. The data was collected using an online survey for US adults, 1500 participants answering questions about their news consumption habits, civic and political participation, and demographic information. The study asked about the use of six platforms: … Continued


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ARTICLE: Political news sites attract ideologically diverse audiences

Partisan selective exposure to news or echo chambers seems not to be the main driver for political polarization, a new study finds. Researchers Jacob L. Nelson and James G. Webster, of Northwestern University, studied audience behaviour on political news sites in the United States. They used comScore data tracking audiences’ behaviours, looking at ideological profiles … Continued



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ARTICLE: Rethinking media’s responsibility towards refugees

Lilie Chouliaraki and Tijana Stolic, both of the London School of Economics and Political Science, studied newspaper headline images from five European countries. They created a typology of visibilities of the ‘crisis’, each proposing different forms of civic agency and responsibility towards refugees. The authors found five types of visibilities: visibility as biological life, empathy, … Continued


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ARTICLE: Four types of “fake news”

So-called fake news have become a widely discussed topic especially since the 2016 presidential elections in the United States. The concept and the term, however, are older, write Edson C. Tandoc Jr., Zheng Wei Lim and Richard Ling, all of Nanyang Technological University. The authors searched for scholarly articles using the term and analysed the … Continued



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ARTICLE: Both audience and journalists unsure of fact checkers

Both journalists and lay social media users have mixed opinions on fact checking and information verification services, write Petter Bae Brandtzaeg and Asbjørn Følstad, both of the Norwegian research company SINTEF, with María Ángeles Chaparro Domínguez, of Universidad Internacional de La Rioja, Spain. The authors conducted group interviews with 18 Norwegian journalism students and individual … Continued