ARTICLE: The audience reacts more strongly to political scandals, if the information is presented bit by bit

Dividing a news story about a political scandal into several pieces will have a stronger effect than presenting all information at once, Christian von Sikorski and Johannes Knoll, both of University of Vienna, write. The authors came to the conclusion after conducting an experiment with 171 university students. The participants all read a (fictitious) story … Continued


Picture: untitled by LudgerA, license CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Journalists are willing to engage with online commenters, but take action to limit the influence

The relationship between online commenters and journalists has been a tricky one. News organizations are struggling with how to allow for audience autonomy while still holding on to power and journalistic authority. J. David Wolfgang of Colorado State University researched how journalists attempt to frame commenting and its role alongside journalism. He did 1) a … Continued


ARTICLE: Who perceive the media to be biased?

What are the contributing factors that cause audience members to perceive the media to be biased? Jakob-Moritz Eberl, of University of Vienna, surveyed over 1 600 Austrians to investigate the question. First, Eberl’s analysis confirmed a number of background factors that contribute to perceived media bias, such as age, education, political interest, and political alignment. … Continued


ARTICLE: Quantifying audiences is not new, but it is more impactful than before

News organisations have been trying to measure their audiences for many decades – long before the internet and measuring instruments based on it proliferated, writes Rodrigo Zamith, of University of Massachusetts Amherst. Zamith’s recent article chronicles the history of audience quantification and reviews the research on it. The current increase in using analytical software and … Continued


CFP JRN

CFP | 27.4. | Vigilante audiences

The Erasmus Research Centre of Media, Communication and Culture is calling for chapter proposals for an upcoming, edited book on “Vigilante Audiences”. The volume will be published online in an open access format. The publication project also includes a two-day workshop, to be held in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, in October 2018. The book will focus … Continued



ARTICLE: Automated news recommendation can be as good as human editors

Is automated news recommendation a threat to content diversity, leading to audience getting trapped inside “filter bubbles”? Judith Möller, Damian Trilling and Natali Helberger, all of University of Amsterdam, with Bram van Es, of eScience Center, investigated the question through a statistical simulation. The authors used a sample of almost 22 000 news articles published … Continued


REPORT: Twitter subcultures are wary of journalism

How do different subcultures interact with, and react to, mainstream journalism on Twitter? A team of American researchers investigated the matter through three American Twitter-spheres: “Black”, “Feminist” and “Asian-American Twitter”. The researchers analysed over 44 million Twitter messages which bore certain subculture-related hashtags, e.g. #blacklivesmatter, #girlslikeus and #freshofftheboat, respectively. In addition, 45 people were interviewed … Continued


Picture: Man reading newspaper by Kaboompics, Karolina, license CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: The effect of format and source type on how people select news

A growing competition for audiences and the proliferation of new sources, sometimes less credible, have changed how people read news. Are the concerns over news consumption specific to the medium on which people get their news? ask George D.H. Pearson and Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick of the Ohio State University. The researchers looked for differing patterns of … Continued


Picture: Coding Screen by Taras Shypka, license CC0 1.0 and text from the study, license CC BY-NC 4.0

ARTICLE: Human-written, automated and combined news articles were seen equally as credible

As many news organizations are already using computer algorithms to produce journalistic content, questions about how audiences view these stories arise. Anja Wölker and Thomas E. Powell of the University of Amsterdam, did an experiment on how readers perceive different forms of automated journalism in regard to credibility of the message and source. Their online … Continued