Picture: Group shot, by Jojo Bombardo, license CC BY-ND 2.0

ARTICLE: British readers spend more time with newspapers in print than online

Even though newspaper circulations have been falling and news are consumed more via smartphones, readers still spend much more time with newspapers’ print versions than with their websites and apps, a study finds. Neil Thurman of LMU Munich and City, University of London, and Richard Fletcher of the University of Oxford, compared time spent with … Continued


Untitled by Andrew Martin, licence CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Negative comments undermine news’ credibility

If online news articles are accompanied by negative comments, the readers will find the articles less credible, T Franklin Waddell, of University of Florida, discovered. Waddell conducted an online experiment with 289 Americans, who were exposed to a news story about heroin addiction. In the experiment participants viewed the same news article, but under eight … Continued



Picture: Stop by Sunny Lapin, license CC BY-SA 2.0

ARTICLE: Deciding which news to trust among competing narratives in Ukraine

With contradictory strategic narratives from different parties and governments, propaganda and disinformation, Ukraine’s news media environment has been a difficult one to analyze properly. Joanna Szostek of Royal Holloway, University of London, investigated how Ukrainian people decide where to get their news and what to believe. The author gathered 30 audio-diaries and in-depth interviews with … Continued


Untitled by Dean Moriarty, licence CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: Why and how do Singaporeans share news?

How do people choose what news to share – and with whom? Debbie Goh, Richard Ling, Liuyu Huang and Doris Liew, all of Nanyang Technological University, investigated the question by focus group interviews with over 60 Singaporeans of various ages and backgrounds. There are two main types of news-sharing behaviour, the authors found. First, the … Continued


Picture: Clean desk photo by Ramino Mendes, license CC0 1.0, edited and cropped

ARTICLE: Grammar still matters in the digital age

Do audiences care about errors in grammar? Alyssa Appelman, of Northern Kentucky University, and Mike Schmierbach, of the Pennsylvania State University, studied how grammatical errors in news articles affect people reading them. They conducted four experiments in the United States. The first two tested the main effects of grammatical errors on audience perceptions, and two … Continued




Untitled by Rachel Scott, licence CC0 1.0

ARTICLE: User generated content makes news appear less trustworthy

“It appears that journalism’s trustworthiness will more likely suffer than benefit from an increased use of UGC”, write Katherine M. Grosser and Florian Wintterlin, both of University of Münster, with Valerie Hase, of University of Zurich (names not in original order). The authors conducted an online experiment with 487 Germans, exposing the participants to articles … Continued


ARTICLE: Habit keeps older people true to traditional news

When it comes to older persons, traditional news media is still the first chosen source of information. The study by Karin Ljuslinder and Anna Sofia Lundgren, both of Umeå Universitet, analyses the narratives of older people about their news media consumption and their reasons for getting news about the surrounding world from the traditional news press. The article … Continued